New CDC Opioid Guidelines Incite Backlash from Patient Groups

New CDC Opioid Guidelines Incite Backlash from Patient Groups – The Alliance for Patient Access

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has drafted new guidelines on prescribing opioids for chronic pain—and they could be bad news for patients living with pain.

Released via webinar last week, the CDC’s guidelines have unsettled patients and incited controversy for a number of reasons:

See also: Secretive guidelines for opioid prescribing from CDC  

* CDC guidelines overlook the legitimate medical need of patients with chronic pain.

The guidelines focus almost solely on reducing abuse—identifying non-pharmacological treatment as “preferred” and advising reduced dosages for patients who rely on opioid pain medications to manage chronic pain.

* CDC’s development process lacked transparency.

Slides used in the CDC’s webinar did not provide the names and affiliations of those who worked to promulgate the guidelines.

As the aforementioned letter described, “The [webinar] presenters refused to provide any information other than to read exactly what was written on the slides even when asked directly by audience members to disclose the processes and people who had developed these prescribing guidelines.”

See also: Opioid War Intrigue: A Crime Drama

* CDC guidelines do not acknowledge FDA process and guidance.

The Food and Drug Administration requires safety and efficacy data for all medications, including the opioid pain medications it has approved. The FDA also approves an information insert to guide physicians in prescribing approved medications.

By creating its own recommended daily maximum doses, the CDC effectively disparages FDA’s expertise.

* CDC guidelines advise on minimizing the risk of abuse, but offer physicians little direction on helping patients manage their pain.

As patient advocates explained, “We need CDC to provide some context around the incidence and prevalence of undertreated pain and the related adverse consequences of undertreated chronic pain on all body systems.

See also: Severe Chronic Pain is a Killer, Literally

With these insights it may actually be possible to improve pain care rather than restricting one treatment based on perceived, not quantified, harms to legitimate patients.”

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