Researcher examining impact of opioid restrictions

UVa researcher examining impact of opioid restrictions

When it comes to curbing opioid addiction, the cure can be worse than the condition.

A researcher at the University of Virginia says she believes many patients with chronic conditions are needlessly suffering with pain because of measures aimed at reducing the risk of opioid addiction.

Virginia LeBaron, an assistant professor at UVa’s School of Nursing, has received a $40,000 grant from the UVa Cancer Center to study what she calls the “concurrent epidemics” of opioid abuse and chronic pain caused by terminal illnesses or severe injuries.  

“As a clinician, I had many patients suffering in pain in part because they couldn’t obtain the medicine they needed,” she said.

New guidelines at the state and federal levels were written to combat the abuse of prescription drugs such as fentanyl and oxycodone.

In March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines advising health care providers to minimize — and, if possible, avoid — prescribing these drugs and to perform urine tests on patients to ensure the drugs are being used properly.

But some patient advocates worry the slew of guidelines could hurt patients. It is not yet clear how Virginia has been affected, but patients in other states are reporting problems.

Media reports in Montana draw attention to the plight of so-called “pain refugees” — hundreds of patients with chronic conditions who regularly fly to California to get pain relief medications since the state tightened restrictions on prescribing opioids.

Patients in Massachusetts have complained their doctors have been more hesitant to prescribe medications they’ve received for years after the CDC released its guidelines.

The guidelines are not backed by any laws, but they’ve had a chilling effect on health care providers,

Many of these providers are taking a very strict interpretation of the guidelines out of fear of lawsuits or medical malpractice charges, Gilson said. They’re playing it safe, but in some cases, they could be subjecting their patients needlessly to pain.

Medical practice is very patient specific — what works with one patient may not work with another,” Gilson said. “The way it’s perceived, practitioners are interpreting this guideline as a hard line dosage that can’t be passed.”

LeBaron said she wants to know whether there’s any evidence the guidelines have cut down on the number of opioid deaths and overdoses, and whether there’s evidence that they have cut off access for patients who may need them.

“Policies really need to be informed by data,” she said

The project has captured the attention of Dr. William A. Hazel, Virginia’s secretary of health and human services.

Hazel said he believes the inquiry will dig up evidence of both undertreatment and overprescription. He said he doesn’t know which is more common, but has seen anecdotal evidence that many of these drugs are going unused.

“I’m not trying to say there’s no place for it,” he said. “But I do think we’ve got to look at the whole issue of pain and suffering in a different way.

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One thought on “Researcher examining impact of opioid restrictions

  1. Laura P. Schulman, MD, MA

    I just found this:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23237736

    Unbelievable that evidence like this is simply suppressed.

    Laura

    On Aug 23, 2016 12:13 PM, “EDS Info (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome)” wrote:

    > Zyp Czyk posted: “UVa researcher examining impact of opioid restrictions > When it comes to curbing opioid addiction, the cure can be worse than the > condition. A researcher at the University of Virginia says she believes > many patients with chronic conditions are needless” >

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply

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