Chronic pain leads to epigenetic changes

Chronic pain changes our immune systems | Channels – McGill University – By Cynthia Lee – Jan 2016

Many anti-opioid folks believe it’s always better not to prescribe/take opioids because they are so extremely dangerous, while pain is “just a feeling” that a person can “deal with”.

However, they are wrong. Pain is not just a “feeling”.

Leaving pain poorly controlled can lead to changes in how our genes are expressed, especially in the immune system.

Pain is the body’s alarm system, intended to get you moving to either fight or flee. It’s an extreme stressor which initiates a chain of biochemical consequences, including those that turn some of our genes on and off. 

 

Epigenetics may bring us one step closer to better treatments for chronic pain

Chronic pain may reprogram the way genes work in the immune system, according to a new study by McGill University researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Chronic pain may reprogram the way genes work in the immune system, according to a new study by McGill University researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports.

“We found that chronic pain changes the way DNA is marked not only in the brain but also in T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for immunity”, says Moshe Szyf, a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at McGill. “Our findings highlight the devastating impact of chronic pain on other important parts of the body such as the immune system.”

Using Rat Models

The all-McGill team examined DNA from brains and white blood cells of rats, using a method that mapped DNA marking by a chemical called a methyl group.

”Methyl marks are important for regulating how these genes function,”

This sort of chemical marking is part of the growing field of epigenetics, which involves modifications that turn genes ‘on’ or ‘off’, effectively reprogramming how they work.

“We were surprised by the sheer number of genes that were marked by the chronic pain — hundreds to thousands of different genes were changed,” adds Szyf.

“We can now consider the implications that chronic pain might have on other systems in the body that we don’t normally associate with pain.”

Possible targets for new pain medications

The findings could open new avenues to diagnosing and treating chronic pain in humans, the researchers suggest, as some of the genes found to be marked by chronic pain could also represent new targets for pain medications.

Reference: “Overlapping signatures of chronic pain in the DNA methylation landscape of prefrontal cortex and peripheral T cells” Renaud Massart, Sergiy Dymov, Magali Millecamps, Matthew Suderman, Stephanie Gregoire, Kevin Koenigs, Sebastian Alvarado, Maral Tajerian, Laura Stone, Moshe Szyf, Scientific Reports DOI: 10.1038/srep19615
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