Yoga can cause musculoskeletal pain

Yoga can cause musculoskeletal pain – Medical News Today – by Honor Whiteman – 2 July 2017

Yoga is often hailed as an effective practice for pain relief.

This has become almost a religious belief among pain specialists, along with general exercise as a “cure” for pain.

A new study, however, notes that yoga can also cause pain, and yoga-related injuries are much more common than one may think.  

The research suggests that every year, more than 10 percent of people who practice yoga in a recreational capacity experience musculoskeletal pain, particularly in the upper limbs, as a result.

What is more, the study found that yoga actually worsens more than a fifth of existing injuries.  

Yoga is one of the most common mind and body practices in the United States, and its popularity is increasing.

According to a survey conducted by Yoga Alliance last year, around 37 million U.S. adults practice yoga, a significant rise from 20 million in 2012.

But why is yoga so appealing?

Aside from its stress-relieving effects, one reason why people are attracted to yoga is its ability to ease pain.

A recent study reported by Medical News Today found that for low back pain, yoga is just as beneficial as physical therapy.

Upper limb pain most common

For their study, the researchers analyzed the data of 354 adults who engaged in recreational yoga.

Participants completed two electronic questionnaires 1 year apart, which gathered information on any musculoskeletal pain they might have, where in the body this pain occurred, and pain severity

The data revealed that 10.7 percent of participants experienced musculoskeletal pain as a result of yoga.

“In terms of severity, more than one third of cases of pain caused by yoga were serious enough to prevent yoga participation and lasted more than 3 months,” notes Prof. Pappas.

Pain in the upper extremities – including the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand – was the most common type of pain caused by yoga

For subjects with pre-existing musculoskeletal injuries, around 21 percent of these injuries were exacerbated by yoga participation, the team reports. Pre-existing upper limb pain was most affected by yoga.

Injury rate higher than previous reports

However, the study also brought some positive news; around 74 percent of participants reported that their pre-existing musculoskeletal pain had improved as a result of yoga.

Still, the researchers believe that their findings highlight the need for caution when it comes to practicing yoga, especially for people who already have musculoskeletal pain.

“Our study found that the incidence of pain caused by yoga is more than 10 percent per year,” says Prof. Pappas, “which is comparable to the injury rate of all sports injuries combined among the physically active population.”

“Yoga participants are encouraged to discuss the risks of injury and any pre-existing pain, especially in the upper limbs, with yoga teachers and physiotherapists to explore posture modifications that may result in safer practice.”

Learn how yoga and meditation affect DNA to alleviate stress.

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One thought on “Yoga can cause musculoskeletal pain

  1. Emily Raven

    What has the EDS crew been saying for years? Gosh, now if only we could take a survey to find outcomes… Oh wait.

    I use modified poses all the time to help pop my tailbone. But all the ones I was directed too by docs and “pain relief/wellness” blogs really messed me up. It’s yet another one size fits all that is best for “health maintenance” (like exercise) for the common person, and should be generally used with caution by anyone sick or fragile.

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