Meditation Does/Does Not Activate Endogenous Opioids

Two studies tested the effect of meditation on endogenous opioids and came to the opposite conclusion, only 3 months apart.

  • March 2017: The results demonstrate that meditation-based pain relief does not require endogenous opioids
  • July 2017: These findings show, for the first time, that meditation involves endogenous opioid pathways, mediating its analgesic effect

Mindfulness-Meditation-Based Pain Relief Is Not Mediated by Endogenous Opioids. – PubMed – NCBI – 2016 Mar  

Mindfulness meditation, a cognitive practice premised on sustaining nonjudgmental awareness of arising sensory events, reliably attenuates pain. Mindfulness meditation activates multiple brain regions that contain a high expression of opioid receptors.

However, it is unknown whether mindfulness-meditation-based analgesia is mediated by endogenous opioids.

The present double-blind, randomized study examined behavioral pain responses in healthy human volunteers during mindfulness meditation and a nonmanipulation control condition in response to noxious heat and intravenous administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone (0.15 mg/kg bolus + 0.1 mg/kg/h infusion) or saline placebo.

Meditation during saline infusion significantly reduced pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to the control + saline group. However, naloxone infusion failed to reverse meditation-induced analgesia.

There were no significant differences in pain intensity or pain unpleasantness reductions between the meditation + naloxone and the meditation + saline groups.

Furthermore, mindfulness meditation during naloxone produced significantly greater reductions in pain intensity and unpleasantness than the control groups.

These findings demonstrate that mindfulness meditation does not rely on endogenous opioidergic mechanisms to reduce pain.

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT:

Endogenous opioids have been repeatedly shown to be involved in the cognitive inhibition of pain.

Mindfulness meditation, a practice premised on directing nonjudgmental attention to arising sensory events, reduces pain by engaging mechanisms supporting the cognitive control of pain.

However, it remains unknown if mindfulness-meditation-based analgesia is mediated by opioids, an important consideration for using meditation to treat chronic pain.

To address this question, the present study examined pain reports during meditation in response to noxious heat and administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone and placebo saline.

The results demonstrate that meditation-based pain relief does not require endogenous opioids. Therefore, the treatment of chronic pain may be more effective with meditation due to a lack of cross-tolerance with opiate-based medications.

Mindfulness Meditation Modulates Pain Through Endogenous Opioids. – PubMed – NCBI – Am J Med. 2016 Jul

BACKGROUND:

Recent evidence supports the beneficial effects of mindfulness meditation on pain. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. We used an opioid blocker to examine whether mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia involves endogenous opioids.

METHODS:

Fifteen healthy experienced mindfulness meditation practitioners participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Participants rated the pain and unpleasantness of a cold stimulus prior to and after a mindfulness meditation session. Participants were then randomized to receive either intravenous naloxone or saline, after which they meditated again, and rated the same stimulus.

RESULTS:

A (3) × (2) repeated-measurements analysis of variance revealed a significant time effect for pain and unpleasantness scores (both P <.001) as well as a significant condition effect for pain and unpleasantness (both P <.2). Post hoc comparisons revealed that pain and unpleasantness scores were significantly reduced after natural mindfulness meditation and after placebo, but not after naloxone. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the pain scores following naloxone vs placebo and participants’ mindfulness meditation experience.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings show, for the first time, that meditation involves endogenous opioid pathways, mediating its analgesic effect and growing resilient with increasing practice to external suggestion. This finding could hold promising therapeutic implications and further elucidate the fine mechanisms involved in human pain modulation.

 

1 thought on “Meditation Does/Does Not Activate Endogenous Opioids

  1. Kathy C

    Guess which “Study” will get more media attention, and get repeated in Mindfulness Books, promotional materials and advertising. The Positive Study has already gotten plenty of attention, and was repeated enough for it to become Belief. In Post Science and Post fact America, that is “science.”

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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