N.H. Bill supports doctors treating pain with opioids

Here’s a very positive development in New Hampshire:

HOUSE BILL 1639-FN – AN ACT relative to healthcare.

Section 5
Requires that boards regulating practitioners
prescribing, administering, and dispensing controlled substances adopt rules for management of chronic pain.

Section 6:
defines chronic pain
for the purposes of the controlled drug prescription health and safety program.  

“Chronic pain” means a state in which pain persists beyond the usual course of an acute disease or healing of an injury, or that might or might not be associated with an acute or chronic pathologic process that causes continuous or intermittent pain over months or years. It also includes intermittent episodic pain that might require periodic treatment.

For the purpose of this subdivision, chronic pain includes but may not be limited to pain defined as

  • “chronic”,
  • “intractable”,
  • “high impact”,
  • “chronic episodic,” and
  • “chronic relapsing.”

A diagnosis of chronic pain made by a practitioner licensed in any of the states in the United States or the District of Columbia and supported by written documentation of the diagnosis by the treating practitioner shall constitute proof that the patient suffers from chronic pain.

standards for the use of opioids for the management or treatment of chronic pain, which shall include the following:

All decisions regarding the treatment of patients experiencing chronic pain shall be made by the treating practitioner even when the treatment is determined to require the prescribing of opioid analgesics.

Treating practitioners shall administer care sufficient to treat a patient’s chronic pain based on ongoing, objective evaluations of the patient without fear of reprimand or discipline.

Ordering, prescribing, dispensing, administering, or paying for controlled substances, including opioid analgesics, shall not in any way be pre-determined by specific Morphine Milligram Equivalent (MME) guidelines.

Ongoing treatment of those patients who experience chronic pain can be determined, managed, and administered by:

(A) A pain management practitioner who specializes in the treatment of chronic pain; or

(B) A practitioner who specializes in the illness or injury from which the patient suffers; or

(C) The patient’s primary care practitioner who shall document the consideration of a consultation with a practitioner who specializes in the treatment of the patient’s specific illness or injury or a pain management practitioner.

For the patient who experiences chronic illness or injury and resulting chronic pain, documentation of the health issue must be provided and held in the patient’s file.

This is a reasonable request and should already be a requirement for any medical care we receive.

For those patients who experience chronic illness or injury and resulting chronic pain who are on a managed and monitored regimen of opioid analgesic treatment and have increased functionality and quality of life as a result of said treatment, treatment shall be continued if there remains no indication of misuse or diversion.

Proper documentation from the practitioner related to the filling of a prescription under this subparagraph shall be provided to the pharmacist upon the initial filling of the prescription, or upon request of the pharmacist.

I was wondering how a pharmacist can determine how much pain we have and how much pain relief we need. Apparently, doctors are required to document this for the pharmacist.

The rules necessary to effectuate the provisions of this subparagraph governing pain management associated with chronic pain shall:

(A) Take into consideration the individualized needs of patients covered by this subparagraph;

(B) Make provisions for practitioners, acting in good faith, and in the course of their profession, and managing chronic pain associated with their patients’ illness to use their best judgment notwithstanding any statute or rule to the contrary; and

(C) Ensure that patients covered by this section are treated with dignity and not unduly denied the medications needed to treat their conditions.

=====

 

(7) For those patients who experience chronic illness or injury and resulting chronic pain who are on a managed and monitored regimen of opioid analgesic treatment and have increased functionality and quality of life as a result of said treatment, treatment shall be continued if there remains no indication of misuse or diversion.

(8) Proper documentation from the practitioner related to the filling of a prescription under this subparagraph shall be provided to the pharmacist upon the initial filling of the prescription, or upon request of the pharmacist.

(9) The rules necessary to effectuate the provisions of this subparagraph governing pain management associated with chronic pain shall:

(A) Take into consideration the individualized needs of patients covered by this subparagraph;

(B) Make provisions for practitioners, acting in good faith, and in the course of their profession, and managing chronic pain associated with their patients’ illness to use their best judgment notwithstanding any statute or rule to the contrary; and

(C) Ensure that patients covered by this section are treated with dignity and not unduly denied the medications needed to treat their conditions

pain

pain acute disease or healing of an injury, or that might or might not be associated with an acute or chronic pathologic process that causes continuous or intermittent pain over months or years. It also includes intermittent episodic pain that might require periodic treatment.

  1. Requires that boards regulating practitioners prescribing, administering, and dispensing controlled substances adopt rules for management of chronic pain.
  2. Defines chronic pain for the purposes of the controlled drug prescription health and safety program.

 

1 thought on “N.H. Bill supports doctors treating pain with opioids

  1. canarensis

    (*head in hands*) ohhhh why, why didn’t I move to NH for grad school when I wanted to?!?! (back in the 90s). I loved it so much I wouldn’t have left, wouldn’t be stuck now in the “Let’s be the most draconian on opioids!” state (Oregon, damn its soul).

    Whining aside, I am really glad some state has started to regain some sanity.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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