Category Archives: Mental Health

Anti-Inflammatories for Depression?

The Depression Puzzle: Are Anti-inflammatories Better Than Anti-depressants? An ME/CFS and FM Perspective – Health Rising

Both depression and inflammation may be present in both chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM).

Antidepressants can help some but not others.

Evidence that inflammation may cause depression in as many as 40% of depressed patients suggests that anti-inflammatories might be better at mood elevation for some ME/CFS/FM patients than antidepressants.  Continue reading

Advertisements

Why we should all give up on goals

BBC – Capital – Why we should all give up on goals already – Nov 2017 by Amanda Ruggeri

“The key for success is, if you have somewhere you’d like to be in five years, don’t be so attached to it that it drives everything you do.

It’s true that decades of research show that goals can get you to work harder, focus more and perform better.

But they also can kill your creativity, make you more likely to cheat, and less likely to thrive.   Continue reading

The Role of GABA in Anxiety

This Month’s Expert: Andrew Goddard , M.D., on The Role of GABA in Anxiety | Psych Central Professional – An interview with Andrew Goddard , M.D.

TCR: Dr. Goddard, you’ve done a lot of neurobiological research in anxiety disorders. It’s a very complex area, but basically what goes on in patients’ brains when they have a panic attack?

Dr. Goddard: It is complex, and initially researchers focused on the actions of monoamines in both depression and anxiety. The “monoamine theory” of depression holds that depression is caused by a depletion of norepinephrine and serotonin.

TCR: Is anxiety thought to result from the same thing?   Continue reading

Why Kindness Is The Answer To Workplace Woes

Why Kindness Is The Answer To Workplace Woes – Nov 28, 2017 – Forbes guest post written by Jaclyn Lindsey – Cofounder and CEO of kindness.org

If you’ve spent even just 10 minutes scanning the headlines in the last month, the workplace can seem like it’s suddenly become a minefield. Sexual harassment. Bullying. Racism. Sexism. Homophobia.

This isn’t news–in fact, it’s been happening since the beginning of time—but in this cultural moment, we are finally talking about these micro- and macro-aggressions openly.

But what are we supposed to do about it?   Continue reading

It is what it is

https://aeon.co/essays/this-is-why-cognitive-behavioural-therapy-works-so-well

Whether we feel happy, engaged and full of energy is derived from the belief that we are in harmony with the world around us.

We maintain this sense of harmony by viewing ourselves, others and the events around us in a relatively benign light: things are fine, we’re safe.

When we perceive the slings and arrows of life as non-events – when we can say: ‘It is what it is’ – we can face difficult circumstances and effectively disarm potential emotional landmines. Continue reading

Genetic Testing for Opioid Pain Mgmt: A Primer

Genetic Testing for Opioid Pain Management: A Primer – free full-text /PMC5447546/

Patients see their primary care physicians (PCPs) for a variety of medical conditions, chronic pain being one of the most common. An increased use of prescription medications (especially opioids) has led to an increase in adverse drug reactions and has heightened our awareness of the variability in response to medications.

Pharmacogenetics has improved our understanding of drug efficacy and response, opened doors to individual tailoring of medical management, and created a series of ethical and economic considerations.

Since it is a relatively new field, genetic testing has not been fully integrated into the primary care setting.  Continue reading

3 Minute Depression Test & Screening

3 Minute Depression Test & Screening. Get Instant Results – Based on the Depression Screening Test by Ivan Goldberg, M.D. – By Arnold Lieber, MD – Oct 2017

According to the NIMH Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting more than 15 million adults in the United States (~6.7% of the population).  Take this self-assessment test to see if you may be someone who could benefit from the treatment and support of a mental health professional.

The above quiz is based on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). If you think you may be suffering from Depression, PsyCom strongly recommends that you seek help from a doctor in order to receive a proper diagnosis and support.

Small acts of kindness at work benefit everyone

Small acts of kindness at work benefit the giver, the receiver and the whole organisation – July 4, 2017 – By Alex Fradera

In the lab, psychologists have shown how generosity propagates and spreads.

If someone is kind to us, we tend to “pay it forward” and act more generously to someone else when given the chance. But it’s not clear if these findings are realistic.

For example, when we’re juggling priorities on a busy work day, might receiving an act of kindness actually be a nuisance, leaving us feeling indebted to return the favour when we’ve got more important things to do?   Continue reading

Online Therapy Raises Plenty Of Ethical Questions

Online Therapy Shows Promise But Raises Plenty Of Ethical Questions – May 2017 – by Jessica Goodheart

For pain patients who have trouble transporting themselves to the weekly appointments required for therapy, this could be a solution. However, I have doubts about how effective it could be for the supposed “catastrophizing” for which we are urged to seek therapy.

These were some of the “success stories” posted this month on the website of Sunnyvale-based BetterHelp, one of a handful of online therapy companies that substitutes the often hard-to-access office visit to a therapist’s office with a suite of online offerings.

Many who need mental health care can’t afford it, while many regions suffer a severe shortage of mental health professionals, and even in counties rich with therapists, many lack the time to make the visit.   Continue reading

Half of “low intensity” CBT clients relapse within 12 months

False economy? Half of “low intensity” CBT clients relapse within 12 months – By Christian Jarrett

Heralded as a revolution in mental health care – a cost-effective way to deliver evidence-based psychological help to large numbers – low-intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recommended by NICE, the independent health advisory body in England and Wales, for mild to moderate depression and anxiety.

Prior studies into its effectiveness have been promising. However, little research has looked at whether the benefits last.

A new study in Behaviour Research and Therapy has done that, following a cohort of people with depression and anxiety over time.   Continue reading