Category Archives: Opioid Debate

Inaccurate Opioid Information Used by Lawmakers

Damaging State Legislation Regarding Opioids: The Need To Scrutinize Sources Of Inaccurate Information Provided To Lawmakers – free full-text /PMC6857667/Michael E Schatman and Hannah Shapiro2019 Nov

On January 22, 2019, a Massachusetts State Representative introduced House Bill 3656, “An Act requiring practitioners to be held responsible for patient opioid addiction”.

Section 50 of this proposed legislation reads, “A practitioner, who issues a prescription … which contains an opiate, shall be liable to the patientfor the payment of the first 90 days of in-patient hospitalization costs if the patient becomes addicted and is subsequently hospitalized”.

When asked of the source of medical information on which he based his bill, the Representative mentioned the name of a nationally known addiction psychiatrist.

Though unmentioned, this is clearly referring to our nemesis, Mr. Kolodny, who has continued using cherry-picked data from years ago to make his claims that “opioids cause addiction”.  Continue reading

How CDC Guidelines Hurt Patients

How CDC Guidelines Hurt – Not Help – Pain Patients by Dez NelsonThe Mighty – Feb 2020

The National Academies released a new consensus report on December 19, 2019, and the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) released an announcement the same day communicating their intention to “develop the evidence” for a new practice guideline for the treatment of acute pain.

This announcement comes on the heels of an ongoing public health disaster that the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) caused by implementing recommendations from the National Academy of Medicine and ignoring dissenting specialists in the field, and that the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has perpetuated via SWAT-style raids on doctor’s offices across the country.

This article sums up exactly what I’ve been complaining about.  Continue reading

Medical Student Bias Against Pain Patients

Study Finds Medical Student Bias Against Pain Patients – Pain Medicine Newsby Michael Vlessides – Feb 2020

Are medical students biased toward patients with chronic pain? If the results of a single-center survey can be generalized to the nation as a whole, the answer seems to be a resounding yes.

Researchers at Michigan State University found that medical students had more negative perceptions of patients with chronic pain in terms of their health, self-care, self-discipline and compliance.

The students believed that patients with chronic pain would require greater patience and be more annoying than patients without chronic pain.   Continue reading

How to File a Civil Rights Complaint | HHS.gov

How to File a Civil Rights Complaint | HHS.gov

I know of at least two people who have done this and are waiting for some resolution which is, of course, delayed and delayed.

Still, it’s one place we can register our grievances when we are mistreated as pain patients – especially if we are denied treatment by doctors just because we take opioids, an especially egregious case.

Like voting, the impact of one individual seems negligible, but every resistance movement has to start with one individual, and then it’s through the accumulation of like-minded individuals that change can be demanded.  Continue reading

PROOF that Rx Opioids NOT Part of Overdose Crisis

This post contains the critical proof we can use to push back against the anti-opioid policies threatening our lives. It draws on public government data and scientific studies to expose the lies promulgated by anti-opioid activists to blame our prescribed opioids for all overdose deaths.

I believe it’s so significant that I’ve created a separate page for it and I’ll be showing it at the top of this blog for a while:

Misperceptions about the ‘Opioid Epidemic’ Thoroughly Debunked with Government Data & Hard Science

‘Opioid Epidemic’? Misperceptions Versus Facts

Misperceptions about the ‘Opioid Epidemic:’ Exploring the Facts July 2019Pain Management Nursing

Thank goodness for nurses! In this lengthy document, they meticulously prove that the ‘Opioid Epidemic’ is a complete fabrication, hyped by anti-opioid activists and spread into our society and even our medical system despite reams of evidence to the contrary from science and government data.

This thoroughly referenced article itemizes and thoroughly debunks the anti-opioid misperceptions (if not outright lies) that have swept through the medical profession and corrupted clear, logical thinking about the rising rate of illicit drug overdoses (not from prescribed opioids).

This is the most sensible document I’ve ever read about the so-called “opioid crisis”. Supported by numerous scientific references, it makes all the arguments we pain patient advocates have been making for years.  Continue reading

Scrutiny Of Painkiller Distributors Harms Patients

Scrutiny Of Painkiller Distributors Harms Patients Sally Satel,  Contributor – Dec 2019

Anyone following the opioid problem knows about the delinquent practices of some drug distributors, the companies that deliver painkillers from manufacturers to pharmacies. 

By transporting “suspicious orders” – regulatory code for unrealistically large shipments — to rogue pharmacies, they helped fuel the crisis of addiction and overdose.

This is like a history lesson from 10 years ago when this was happening. By now the overdoses are no longer from pills because they’re too difficult to get and too expensive. Instead, they use some powdered street drug (heroin, meth, cocaine) that’s been laced with undetermined quantities of fentanyl, frequently enough to kill them.  Continue reading

Difference Between Drug Addiction and Dependence

Is There Really a Difference Between Drug Addiction and Drug Dependence? – Scientific American Blog NetworkBy Jonathan N. Stea -November 2019 (repost)

As a follow-up to a previous post, Addiction vs dependence | National Institute on Drug Abuse, here’s an article from the Scientific American pointing out the messy confusion between the two created by the DSM-5.

It is no secret that misinformation about addiction is rampant in popular media. One particular area of misinformation concerns what language gets used when describing topics related to addiction.

all sorts of individuals—medical professionals, journalists, parents, people who use substances, people in recovery—incessantly argue over terminology such as “addiction,” “dependence,” “abuse,” “misuse,” “habit-forming,” “recreational use” or “medicinal use.”   Continue reading

Inaccurate Information Provided To Lawmakers

Damaging State Legislation Regarding Opioids: The Need To Scrutinize Sources Of Inaccurate Information Provided To Lawmakers – free full-text /PMC6857667/Nov 2019

Lawmakers are making laws on the basis of inaccurate information provided by persons without expertise in chronic pain management.

The whole country is awash in PROPaganda spread by those who do not understand, much less experience themselves, the extreme physical limitations, subsequent mood disorders, negative social impact, and unnecessary suffering caused by constant unrelieved pain.

On January 22, 2019, a Massachusetts State Representative introduced House Bill 3656, “An Act requiring practitioners to be held responsible for patient opioid addiction”.    Continue reading

How Stigma Against Addiction Devastates Pain Patients

How Stigma Against Addiction Devastates Pain Patientsby Elizabeth Brico @elizabethbricoFeb 2019

Here’s yet another story of what would qualify as malpractice if it were any other drug than opioids.  A doctor suddenly stops prescribing opioids necessary for the “activities of daily living” and sends their patient into the agony of physical withdrawal and an unnecessarily limited life without medical care.

There’s no concern for Quality of Life when politicians responding to media-hype and PROPagandists are controlling our pain care.

First it was a hip replacement. Then it became complicated by a MRSA infection. Eventually, Dee Giles, formerly an ER nurse, had to endure amputation of her right leg and the right half of her pelvis. Continue reading