Category Archives: Pain Management

Liquid Gold: Urine Drug Screening for Profit

Liquid Gold: Pain Doctors Soak Up Profits By Screening Urine For Drugs | Kaiser Health News – Nov 2017 –  By Fred Schulte and Elizabeth Lucas

The cups of urine travel by express mail to the Comprehensive Pain Specialists lab in an industrial park in Brentwood, Tenn., not far from Nashville.

Most days bring more than 700 of the little sealed cups from clinics across 10 states, wrapped in red-tagged waste bags. The network treats about 48,000 people each month, and many will be tested for drugs.

Gloved lab techs keep busy inside the cavernous facility, piping smaller urine samples into tubes.  Continue reading

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Oxytocin to Manage Chronic Pain

Oxytocin, an Opioid Alternative, Ready for Regular Clinical Use to Manage Chronic Pain

Editor’s Memo November 2017: Dr. Tennant opens an overdue discussion on the history and future of pain medication alternatives.

From a purely pharmacologic and physiologic perspective, we really have not had a relatively safe, potent alternative to opioids since the 1890s.

In those early days, doctors at Brompton Hospital in London described the use of opioids, morphine, and heroin, as well as a stimulant known as cocaine, which when combined (aka the Brompton cocktail) was prescribed to lessen the pain associated with a terminal illness.   Continue reading

Opioid Alternative, Oxytocin, for Chronic Pain

Oxytocin, an Opioid Alternative, Ready for Regular Clinical Use to Manage Chronic Pain – 

Editor’s Memo November 2017:  Dr. Tennant opens an overdue discussion on the history and future of pain medication alternatives.

…the pharmacologic properties of almost all of the currently available analgesics were established and clinically implemented more than a century ago.

Yet, a safe and effective option with a unique pharmacologic mechanism that has been right in front of us — oxytocin — has emerged as an excellent pain reliever.   Continue reading

Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth

Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth – 30 August 2017

The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet, reporting on the effects of ibuprofen on the skeletal muscles and published in Acta Physiologica.

Most mild analgesic and antipyretic OTC drugs, apart from paracetamol, are of the NSAID (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) kind. These drugs are some of the most widely consumed in the world, and they all inhibit the so-called COX enzymes.   Continue reading

Hype around Mindfulness and Meditation

Mind the Hype: A Critical Evaluation and Prescriptive Agenda for Research on Mindfulness and Meditation Perspectives on Psychological Science – Oct 2017

During the past two decades, mindfulness meditation has gone from being a fringe topic of scientific investigation to being

  • an occasional replacement for psychotherapy, 
  • tool of corporate well-being,
  • widely implemented educational practice, and
  • “key to building more resilient soldiers.

Yet the mindfulness movement and empirical evidence supporting it have not gone without criticism.  Continue reading

The Politics of Pain – Re-post

The Politics of Pain | Proto Magazine | Oct 02, 2015 | Re-post

This was written 2 years ago, but it’s still a good overview of the history of the National Pain Strategy.

A national pain strategy: Decades in arriving, tangled in an epidemic of painkiller abuse, will it ever emerge to help those who need it?

TERESA SHAFFER’S chronic back pain began 25 years ago, after she gave birth to her third child. It was so severe that she could barely get out of bed, and so began a frustrating odyssey from one physician to another. Continue reading

Pain Ed for Professionals from a Lay Perspective

Trust me, I’m a patient: pain education for professionals from a lay perspective – Br J Pain. 2012 May – Dorothy Helme – Lay member, British Pain Society Patient Liaison Committee.

A young woman with arthritis talking about the rising tide of hostility to disability claimants says: ‘People think I’m faking. I’ve lost friends over it. Pain is invisible and hard for people to understand.’ How many of us could say that we have never thought that someone reporting pain is faking or, at the very least, making too much fuss?

This is the society in which we live: intolerant of the pain of others.  Continue reading

Alliance for the Treatment of Intractable Pain (ATIP)

Together with several of his colleagues in the battle for pain patients’ rights, Richard “Red” Lawhern, Ph.D. recently unveiled a new organization,

Alliance for the Treatment of Intractable Pain (ATIP)
ATIP on Facebook

This is a group of and for people willing to take an active part in changing the rules about pain treatment in this country, starting with lobbying to reject/repeal/replace the unscientific and biased CDC Opioid Prescribing Guideline. 

If you’re looking for a way to make your voice heard, ATIP can help you channel it effectively.  Continue reading

Electroceuticals: the Shocking Future of Brain Zapping

Electroceuticals: the Shocking Future of Brain Zapping: Could electrical currents replace Big Pharma? – Beenish Ahmed and Eric Elder – Mar 10 2015

It’s all in your head—those icky feelings, all that fog—and chemicals just aren’t that great at cutting through. That’s why scientists are experimenting with changing the brain game by tweaking its circuitry, rather than the chemical processes.

It might be a bit unnerving to us seasoned pill-poppers, but some believe that electrical currents could be the new wave in everything cerebral, from treating depression and addiction to enhancements that would enable those seeking that mental edge to learn new skills faster or remember more.

While pharmaceutical companies rake in nearly $90 billion a year from global sales of mental health meds, psychopharmacology research and development has slowed to a crawl.   Continue reading

Upper crossed syndrome: Causes, symptoms, exercises

Upper crossed syndrome: Causes, symptoms, and exercises – August 2017

People with hypermobility (EDS) tend to develop this muscular imbalance, but it’s one of the few structural problems we can fix – with exercise.

Upper crossed syndrome refers to a particular configuration of overlapping overactive and underactive muscle groups in the neck, chest, and shoulders.

Typically, poor posture causes the syndrome, including the forward head posture, which occurs when people use electronic devices, read, and drive. Those with upper crossed syndrome usually have the same or similar set of postural irregularities that people may describe as slouching.   Continue reading