Tag Archives: anatomy

Neurological and Spinal Manifestations of EDS

Neurological and spinal manifestations of the Ehlers–Danlos syndromesHenderson – 2017 – American Journal of Medical Genetics Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics – Wiley Online LibraryFeb 2017

This research review makes it very clear that people with EDS suffer a great deal of pain from the neck up, that EDS is a physically disabling condition, and that its effects are multi-systemic.

This is the article I will present to the new doctor that is taking over from the wonderful doctor who has been prescribing me sufficient opioid pain medication for the last 10 years.  They work in the same medical group and this new doctor has on occasion refilled my opioid prescriptions when my regular doctor wasn’t available, so I hope she will continue doing so.

Just reading this review crushes any hope I’ve had of ever “getting better” because there are so many physical issues that arise when our body structures are held together (or rather, not held together) by defective connective tissue.

Continue reading

Fascia Research from the NIH

Because fascia is made from collagen, the genetic defect from EDS will often cause us problems with this tissue. It’s thin, fragile, stretches too much, and gives way too easily.

PubMed Central® (PMC) is a free full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM).

Research on the body’s fascia (connective tissue) is finding more and more of its functions and abilities, going far beyond just “holding stuff together”.  I’ve posted here the abstracts of the following 4 articles and you can decide for yourself if they’re worth reading in full.

  1. Smooth Muscle
  2. Visceral Fascia
  3. Bone Tissue
  4. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

Continue reading

Joint Hypermobility -> Anxiety in Dogs too

First evidence for an association between joint hypermobility and excitability in a non-human species, the domestic dog – Free full-text /PMC6565730/ – Jun 2019

There is a well-established relationship between joint hypermobility and anxiety in humans, that has not previously been investigated in other species.

A population of 5575 assistance dogs were scored for both hip hypermobility and 13 behaviour characteristics using previously validated methods.

Our results suggest a positive association between hip joint hypermobility and emotional arousal in domestic dogs, which parallel results found in people.    Continue reading

Fat tissue can communicate with other organs

Fat tissue can communicate with other organs | National Institutes of Health (NIH)by Tianna Hicklin, Ph.D. – Feb 2017

I’m posting this because it upends the common belief that fat is inert. We usually view fat as an unnecessary and monolithic “blob” to be pared down as much as we can, but here we see it’s much more complicated than that.

At a Glance

  • Researchers discovered that fat tissue releases signals called microRNAs into the bloodstream that regulate genes in another organ.
  • The findings suggest new ways to treat metabolism-related diseases like obesity and diabetes.

Continue reading

Low Energy Production and Pain in Fibromyalgia

Low Energy Production and Pain in Fibromyalgia – Is Your Microcirculation To Blame? – Health Rising – https://www.healthrising.org – by Cort Johnson | May 25, 2014

Exercise is highly recommended as an adjunct therapy in fibromyalgia. 

Those of us with fibromyalgia know how extremely difficult this becomes. Our bodies seem to resist us with all their might and this article offers a possible explanation.

A 2010 review of exercise studies found that ‘slight to moderate’ intensity aerobic exercise sessions done two to three times a week worked best, and that appropriate levels of exercise result in improved fitness but only modestly improved pain.   Continue reading

Mobile Cecum in a Young Woman with EDS

Mobile Cecum in a Young Woman with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility type: A Case Report and Review of the Literature – Oct 2017 – free full-text /PMC5675945/

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is unexpectedly common and is associated with a high rate of gastrointestinal manifestations.

We herein report the first documented case of mobile cecum associated with EDS-HT. A 21-year-old woman with repeated right lower abdominal pain was initially diagnosed with EDS-HT.

The cecum is an intraperitoneal pouch that is considered to be the beginning of the large intestine. It is typically located on the right side of the body (the same side of the body as the appendix, to which it is joined).  Continue reading

Hotter bodies fight infections and tumors better

Hotter bodies fight infections and tumors better — researchers show how — ScienceDaily – May 21, 2018 – Source: University of Warwick

I’ve always wondered about this: if our bodies deliberately start a fever to fight an infection, why do we always want to lower it? Now it looks like fevers also help with

The hotter our body temperature, the more our bodies speed up a key defense system that fights against tumors, wounds or infections

The researchers have demonstrated that small rises in temperature (such as during a fever) speed up the speed of a cellular ‘clock’ that controls the response to infections — and this new understanding could lead to more effective and fast-working drugs which target a key protein involved in this process. Continue reading

Fat Cells Migrate to Wounds to Drive Repair

Fat Body Cells Are Motile and Actively Migrate to Wounds to Drive Repair and Prevent Infection – Science Direct – Feb 2018 – free full-text article

I just found this interesting: the body fat cells that we so want to get rid of actually have a critical role in wound healing.

Highlights

  • Fat body cells actively migrate to wounds using a peristaltic mode of motility
  • Fat body cells tightly seal the gap by forming lamellipodia around the wound margin
  • Fat body cells collaborate with macrophages to clear wound debris
  • Fat body cells locally release antimicrobial peptides at infected wounds

Continue reading

Pain Reactions Measured by Visual Orientation

Pain Affects Visual Orientation: an Eye-Tracking Study – Journal of Pain – February 2018

Because of its unique evolutionary relevance, it is understood that pain automatically attracts attention.

So far, such attentional bias has mainly been shown for pain-related stimuli whereas little is known about shifts in attentional focus after actual painful stimulation.

Our bodies were designed to respond immediately to pain. To remedy the situation causing it is our prime directive. This cannot be easily overruled by design and calling it “catastrophizing” does not ease its urge to action.  Continue reading