Tag Archives: anxiety

The Role of GABA in Anxiety

This Month’s Expert: Andrew Goddard , M.D., on The Role of GABA in Anxiety | Psych Central Professional – An interview with Andrew Goddard , M.D.

TCR: Dr. Goddard, you’ve done a lot of neurobiological research in anxiety disorders. It’s a very complex area, but basically what goes on in patients’ brains when they have a panic attack?

Dr. Goddard: It is complex, and initially researchers focused on the actions of monoamines in both depression and anxiety. The “monoamine theory” of depression holds that depression is caused by a depletion of norepinephrine and serotonin.

TCR: Is anxiety thought to result from the same thing?   Continue reading

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It is what it is

https://aeon.co/essays/this-is-why-cognitive-behavioural-therapy-works-so-well

Whether we feel happy, engaged and full of energy is derived from the belief that we are in harmony with the world around us.

We maintain this sense of harmony by viewing ourselves, others and the events around us in a relatively benign light: things are fine, we’re safe.

When we perceive the slings and arrows of life as non-events – when we can say: ‘It is what it is’ – we can face difficult circumstances and effectively disarm potential emotional landmines. Continue reading

Online Therapy Raises Plenty Of Ethical Questions

Online Therapy Shows Promise But Raises Plenty Of Ethical Questions – May 2017 – by Jessica Goodheart

For pain patients who have trouble transporting themselves to the weekly appointments required for therapy, this could be a solution. However, I have doubts about how effective it could be for the supposed “catastrophizing” for which we are urged to seek therapy.

These were some of the “success stories” posted this month on the website of Sunnyvale-based BetterHelp, one of a handful of online therapy companies that substitutes the often hard-to-access office visit to a therapist’s office with a suite of online offerings.

Many who need mental health care can’t afford it, while many regions suffer a severe shortage of mental health professionals, and even in counties rich with therapists, many lack the time to make the visit.   Continue reading

Half of “low intensity” CBT clients relapse within 12 months

False economy? Half of “low intensity” CBT clients relapse within 12 months – By Christian Jarrett

Heralded as a revolution in mental health care – a cost-effective way to deliver evidence-based psychological help to large numbers – low-intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recommended by NICE, the independent health advisory body in England and Wales, for mild to moderate depression and anxiety.

Prior studies into its effectiveness have been promising. However, little research has looked at whether the benefits last.

A new study in Behaviour Research and Therapy has done that, following a cohort of people with depression and anxiety over time.   Continue reading

Link Between Breathing and Anxiety

The breathing conundrum – interoceptive sensitivity and anxiety  2013 Oct – free full-text PMC article

This review focuses on the relationship between breathing and anxiety.

Several anxiety disorders have been associated with

  • altered breathing,
  • perception of breathing and
  • response to manipulations of breathing.

Both clinical and experimental research studies are reviewed that relate breathing dysfunctions to anxiety.   Continue reading

Emotion processing in joint hypermobility

Emotion processing in joint hypermobility: A potential link to the neural bases of anxiety and related somatic symptoms in collagen anomalies. – PubMed – NCBI – Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Feb

Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) has repeatedly been associated with anxiety and anxiety disorders, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and temporomandibular joint disorder.

However, the neural underpinnings of these associations still remain unclear.

This study explored brain responses to facial visual stimuli with emotional cues using fMRI techniques in general population with different ranges of hypermobility.   Continue reading

Interoceptive sensitivity and anxiety

The breathing conundrum – interoceptive sensitivity and anxiety – Oct 2013 – free full-text PMC articlle

Various controlled breathing practices seem to have powerful effects on the nervous system, probably through stimulation of the vagus nerve.

This review focuses on the relationship between breathing and anxiety.

Several anxiety disorders have been associated with

  • altered breathing,
  • perception of breathing and
  • response to manipulations of breathing.

Continue reading

Working Memory Role in Emotional Regulation

When the going gets negative, recruit working memory — ScienceDaily — November 21, 2016

Working memory, the ability to process information, may play an important role in coping with negative life events, according to a new study by Dr. Tracy Alloway, associate professor of psychology at the University of North Florida.

“There is a growing body of research supporting the role of working memory in emotional regulation.”

We know that

  1. those with clinical depression have difficulties in suppressing irrelevant negative information, while
  2. those with high working memory are able to ignore negative emotions.   Continue reading

LInks between Chronic Pain, Anxiety, and Depression

Association of Depression and Anxiety Alone and in Combination with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in Primary Care Patients – Psychosom Med. 2008 Oct; – free full-text PMC article

Objective:
To assess the relationship between depression and anxiety comorbidity on pain intensity, pain-related disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQL).

INTRODUCTION

Pain is a significant public health problem, with a third (1) to more than half (2) of adults in population-based surveys suffering from chronic or recurrent pain.  

Pain is the most pervasive symptom reported in the community and primary care setting (3–5) and accounts for nearly 20% of all ambulatory visits in the US (6).   Continue reading

Link Between Chronic Pain and Anxiety

Study Reveals Connection between Chronic Pain and Anxiety – National Pain Report

New research reveals a little-understood connection between chronic pain and anxiety, and offers a potential target for treatment, according to a release from the University of Vermont.

University of Vermont (UVM) researchers published their findings as an Article in Press in Biological Psychiatry.  Their study revealed that increased expression of PACAP – a peptide neurotransmitter the body releases in response to stress – is also increased in response to neuropathic pain and contributes to these symptoms.

“Chronic pain and anxiety-related disorders frequently go hand-in-hand,” says senior author Victor May, Ph.D., professor of neurological sciences at the University of Vermont.  May and members of the research team found that PACAP was also highly expressed in women exhibiting PTSD symptoms, in a 2011 study.

While May and his colleagues saw an increase in anxiety-related behaviors in models of chronic pain, the anxious behavior and pain hypersensitivity were significantly reduced when a PACAP receptor antagonist – designed to block the response – was applied.