Tag Archives: anxiety

Interoceptive Sensitivity and Emotional Experience

Interoceptive Sensitivity and Self-Reports of Emotional Experience – free full-text /PMC1224728/ – Sep 2005

I’m interested in how my anxiety relates to my EDS, so I plowed through this long article. It appears that “interoceptive sensitivity” (which is usually extreme in people with EDS) seems to be not just a discrete biomarker but also a driver of anxiety (a strong arousal focus).

People differ in the extent to which they emphasize feelings of activation or deactivation in their verbal reports of experienced emotion, termed arousal focus (AF).

Two multimethod studies indicate that AF is linked to heightened interoceptive sensitivity (as measured by performance on a heartbeat detection task).   Continue reading

Stressed out? Your dog may feel it too

Stressed out? Your dog may feel it too, study suggests – by Jeremy Rehm, washingtonpost.com – June 6, 2019

After reading this, I feel very sorry for my poor little dog. We spend almost all our time together (I take him everywhere with me in the car), so we’re extremely close and affected by each other.

I know that how we really feel cannot be hidden from our dogs, no matter how well our “acting OK” fools other humans, but I didn’t realize the depth and intensity of this invisible effect. Now I have another reason to get upset: my constant stress and worry about getting sufficient pain relief, not to mention the pain itself, is hurting my dog too.

When dog owners go through a stressful period, they’re not alone in feeling the pressure — their dogs feel it too, a new study suggests.   Continue reading

Neurovisceral expression of psychiatric symptoms

Neurovisceral phenotypes in the expression of psychiatric symptoms | Autonomic Neuroscience | Review ARTICLE |February 2015 (modified repost from 2/6/16)

This review supports what I’ve long suspected: it’s not just my body that’s hypermobile, but my emotions as well. There’s evidence that collagen disorders affect much more than joints due to the altered biochemical properties of this protein that’s ubiquitous in our bodies.

This review explores the proposal that vulnerability to psychological symptoms, particularly anxiety, originates in constitutional differences in the control of bodily state, exemplified by a set of conditions that include Joint Hypermobility, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope.

Research is revealing how brain-body mechanisms underlie individual differences in psychophysiological reactivity that can be important for predicting, stratifying and treating individuals with anxiety disorders and related conditions.  Continue reading

Joint Hypermobility -> Anxiety in Dogs too

First evidence for an association between joint hypermobility and excitability in a non-human species, the domestic dog – Free full-text /PMC6565730/ – Jun 2019

There is a well-established relationship between joint hypermobility and anxiety in humans, that has not previously been investigated in other species.

A population of 5575 assistance dogs were scored for both hip hypermobility and 13 behaviour characteristics using previously validated methods.

Our results suggest a positive association between hip joint hypermobility and emotional arousal in domestic dogs, which parallel results found in people.    Continue reading

Enhanced Interoception Links EDS and Anxiety

How Enhanced Interoception links EDS and Anxiety  – Wikipedia

I wasn’t aware of the complexity involved in “feeling what I’m feeling”, so I’m posting relevant parts of this extensive article.

Knowing a bit about interoception is critical to understanding how a disorder of the connective tissue like EDS can result in altered emotions, mostly anxiety, through biochemical processes.

Interoception is contemporarily defined as the sense of the internal state of the body.   Continue reading

Link between anxiety and joint hypermobility

Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility – May 2014

This study makes connections between the acute perception of our internal body states, which trigger excessive activation of our amygdala, with anxiety.

In lay terms, we are too sensitive and too responsive, thus unable to hold life’s rougher times at an arm’s distance. It’s as though we lack the protective barrier built into the “hardware” of most people to shield them from the extremes of their environment.

Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased “interoceptive” sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal.   Continue reading

Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility

Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type:… – PubMed – NCBI: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised. – Mar 2015 – partial repost from Latest EDS Research: March 2015

Having suffered from crippling anxiety in episodes lasting for days to weeks, I started researching, hoping to find some clues for new treatments. Instead, I found numerous studies showing that my anxiety is probably another “symptom” of my EDS and thus “incurable”.

This is just another painful feeling (in addition to physical pain) that I’m doomed to suffer for the rest of my life.

Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome – JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals.

Continue reading

Hormonal Contraception and Depression

Association of Hormonal Contraception With Depression – JAMA Network – Charlotte Wessel Skovlund, MSc1; Lina Steinrud Mørch, PhD1; Lars Vedel Kessing, MD, DMSc2; et al. – November 2016

Question:  Is use of hormonal contraception associated with treatment of depression?

Spoiler alert: the answer is a resounding “yes”.  all the patients who didn’t get antidepressants (which require a pain or depression diagnosis).

Progesterone is in all birth-control pills, yet women seeking contraception are given these pills almost routinely, and never with the warning that they could cause depression.

This could explain why women tend to be more depressed than men.

Findings:  In a nationwide prospective cohort study of more than 1 million women living in Denmark, an increased risk for first use of an antidepressant and first diagnosis of depression was found among users of different types of hormonal contraception, with the highest rates among adolescents.   Continue reading

Your brain on PMS is like your brain on alcohol

Your brain on PMS is like your brain on alcohol and depressants – By Cassie Werber December 21, 2016

Recent research into hormonal contraceptives found a clear link between them and depression.

That’s hardly surprising, the researcher says, when you consider that all hormonal contraceptives contain progesterone, and some are progesterone-only.

How and why progesterone alters moods is understudied, but there’s a growing body of research, based on the results of blood tests and brain scans, conducted by Poromaa and others. One discovery from this research is that progesterone can trigger the small, almond-shaped part of the brain called the amygdala.   Continue reading

Neurobiology and Neurophysiology of Breath

Neurobiology and Neurophysiology of Breath Practices in Psychiatric Care | Psychiatric Times – by Patricia L. Gerbarg, MD and Richard P. Brown, MD – Nov 30, 2016

Because the physical act of breathing stimulates the vagus nerve, it has a powerful effect on our whole nervous system.

Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is associated with most disorders seen in pediatric and adult psychiatric practice, including anxiety disorders, depression, PTSD, hostility and aggression, attention deficit disorders, and autism spectrum disorder.

Increasing the underactivity of the parasympathetic branch and correcting the erratic or overactivity of the sympathetic branch can improve stress resilience and ameliorate psychological and physical symptoms.    Continue reading