Tag Archives: anxiety

Neurosteroids: Endogenous Role in Human Brian

Neurosteroids: Endogenous Role in the Human Brian and Therapeutic Potentials – free full-text /PMC3139029/ – July 2011

This chapter provides an overview of neurosteroids, especially their impact on the brain, sex differences and therapeutic potentials.

Neurosteroids are synthesized within the brain and rapidly modulate neuronal excitability. Neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone are positive allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors with powerful antiseizure activity in diverse animal models.

Neurosteroids increase both synaptic and tonic inhibition. They are endogenous regulators of seizure susceptibility, anxiety and stress.

This is exactly the kind of information I was looking for: a potential new treatment for the anxiety that has tormented me for decades.  Continue reading

Neurosteroids in the Treatment of Anxiety

Neurosteroids as Neuromodulators in the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders free full-text /PMC3356011/ – Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). Oct 2011

Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders. They are frequently treated with benzodiazepines, which are fast acting highly effective anxiolytic agents. However, their long-term use is impaired by tolerance development and abuse liability.

In contrast, antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered as first-line treatment but have a slow onset of action.

Neurosteroids are powerful allosteric modulators of GABAA and glutamate receptors. However, they also modulate sigma receptors and they are modulated themselves by SSRIs.   Continue reading

6 Health Problems with EDS

I posted this information in 2017, but I think it’s worth another look. It gives a good overview of what patients with this connective tissue disorder have to deal with.

Below is a collection of PubMed articles discussing 6 (there are many more) different medical problems that people with EDS have to deal with.

Most Important:
Problems with Local Anesthetic

Local anesthetic failure in joint hypermobility syndrome ; Alan J Hakim, Rodney Grahame, Paul Norris, and Colin Hopper; J R Soc Med. 2005 Feb;  – full-text PMC article Continue reading

Pregnenolone for Bipolar Depression

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Pregnenolone for Bipolar Depression – free full-text /PMC4200497/Jul 2014

Depression in bipolar disorder (BPD) is challenging to treat. Therefore, additional medication options are needed. In the current report, the effect of the neurosteroid pregnenolone on depressive symptoms in BPD was examined.

Pregnenolone was well tolerated. The results suggest that pregnenolone may improve depressive symptoms in patients with BPD and can be safely administered.

That’s an unusually positive note with which to end the abstract, and I think there’s some truth to it – at least for me. After finding multiple articles about how neurosteroids are helpful for depression and anxiety, I started experimenting.  Continue reading

The GABAergic Hypothesis of Depression/Anxiety

The GABAergic Deficit Hypothesis of Major Depressive Disorder – free full-text /PMC3412149/ – Mol Psychiatry. – Apr 2011

This is a very technical article on a newer theory about what “causes” depression and anxiety.

My increasing desperation during bouts of increasing anxiety lately has motivated me to search for alternate routes of treating it (since I cannot have benzodiazepines due to taking opioids). It feels like my depression and anxiety always come together, so any new idea about treating depression gives me hope it could also alleviate my anxiety.

Here we summarize clinical and preclinical evidence supporting a central and causal role of GABAergic deficits in the etiology of depressive disorders. Increasing evidence points to an association between major depressive disorders (MDDs) and diverse types of GABAergic deficits.

Continue reading

Suicidal Thoughts Linked to Musculoskeletal Pain

Suicidal Thoughts Linked to Pain in Those with Rheumatic or Musculoskeletal DiseaseBy Janice Wood July 2019

A new survey highlights the significant impact of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) on mental health.

The survey of more than 900 RMD patients revealed that pain had caused one in 10 to have suicidal thoughts in the previous four weeks. Pain also caused 58 percent to feel that everything was unmanageable for them.

This is a feeling I know only too well: the sinking sensation every time I think about how I’m going to get through this life, feeling completely overwhelmed by even trivial tasks, running around in mental circles looking for a way out of an unbearable situation…  Continue reading

Neuroimaging Anxiety in Hypermobility

Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility – free full-text /PMC4196473/ – Oct 2014

Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased “interoceptive” sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal.

Joint hypermobility, an expression of a common variation in the connective tissue protein collagen, is increasingly recognized as a risk factor to anxiety and related disorders.

This study explored the link between anxiety, interoceptive sensitivity and hypermobility in a sub-clinical population using neuroimaging and psychophysiological evaluation.   Continue reading

Interoception as a Biomarker in Psychiatry

Can Interoception Improve the Pragmatic Search for Biomarkers in Psychiatry? – free full-text /PMC4958623/ – Jul 2016

This is another one of the articles I found about the extreme interoceptive sensitivity of people with hypermobility/EDS and how it is linked to anxiety.

Disrupted interoception is a prominent feature of the diagnostic classification of several psychiatric disorders. To examine the degree to which the scientific community has recognized interoception as a construct of interest,

we identified and individually screened all articles published in the English language on interoception and associated root terms in Pubmed, Psychinfo, and ISI Web of Knowledge.    Continue reading

Interoceptive Sensitivity and Emotional Experience

Interoceptive Sensitivity and Self-Reports of Emotional Experience – free full-text /PMC1224728/ – Sep 2005

I’m interested in how my anxiety relates to my EDS, so I plowed through this long article. It appears that “interoceptive sensitivity” (which is usually extreme in people with EDS) seems to be not just a discrete biomarker but also a driver of anxiety (a strong arousal focus).

People differ in the extent to which they emphasize feelings of activation or deactivation in their verbal reports of experienced emotion, termed arousal focus (AF).

Two multimethod studies indicate that AF is linked to heightened interoceptive sensitivity (as measured by performance on a heartbeat detection task).   Continue reading

Stressed out? Your dog may feel it too

Stressed out? Your dog may feel it too, study suggests – by Jeremy Rehm, washingtonpost.com – June 6, 2019

After reading this, I feel very sorry for my poor little dog. We spend almost all our time together (I take him everywhere with me in the car), so we’re extremely close and affected by each other.

I know that how we really feel cannot be hidden from our dogs, no matter how well our “acting OK” fools other humans, but I didn’t realize the depth and intensity of this invisible effect. Now I have another reason to get upset: my constant stress and worry about getting sufficient pain relief, not to mention the pain itself, is hurting my dog too.

When dog owners go through a stressful period, they’re not alone in feeling the pressure — their dogs feel it too, a new study suggests.   Continue reading