Tag Archives: collagen

Link between anxiety and joint hypermobility

Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility – May 2014

This study makes connections between the acute perception of our internal body states, which trigger excessive activation of our amygdala, with anxiety.

In lay terms, we are too sensitive and too responsive, thus unable to hold life’s rougher times at an arm’s distance. It’s as though we lack the protective barrier built into the “hardware” of most people to shield them from the extremes of their environment.

Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased “interoceptive” sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal.   Continue reading

Connective Tissue & the Brain

Connective Tissue & the BrainAugust 19, 2018 · by Emily Casanova

Connective tissue is a fibrous cell-sparse network that helps to connect, support, bind, and separate neighboring tissues from one another.

It exists in and around every organ of the body.

Probably the most recognizable forms of connective tissue are bones (calcified), tendons, ligaments, cartilage, and fats. One major component of connective tissue is the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is composed of various molecules (e.g., proteins) that give structural and communicative support to nearby cells.  Continue reading

The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy and function

The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy, function and clinical considerations – free full-text /PMC3512278/ – J Anat. – 2012 May 27.

In this overview, new and existent material on the organization and composition of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) will be evaluated in respect to its anatomy, innervation biomechanics and clinical relevance.

The integration of the passive connective tissues of the TLF and active muscular structures surrounding this structure are discussed, and the relevance of their mutual interactions in relation to low back and pelvic pain reviewed.

The TLF is a girdling structure consisting of several aponeurotic and fascial layers that separates the paraspinal muscles from the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall.   Continue reading

Living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Living with Ehlers-Danlos SyndromeReviewed by Susha Cheriyedath, MSc – Oct 26, 2017

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, in short, EDS refers to a bunch of hereditary connective tissue disorders.

Connective tissues are a complex mixture of proteins and other substances that provide strength and elasticity to the underlying structures in the human body.  Continue reading

Widespread Effects of Defective Collagen

Collagen – Wikipedia – This protein, affected by Ehlers-Danlos and other connective tissue disorders, has multiple critical roles and gives structural support throughout the whole body.

Collagen is the main structural protein in the extracellular space in the various connective tissues in animal bodies.

As the main component of connective tissue, it is the most abundant protein in mammals, making up from 25% to 35% of the whole-body protein content.

Depending upon the degree of mineralization, collagen tissues may be rigid (bone), compliant (tendon), or have a gradient from rigid to compliant (cartilage).  Continue reading

Fascia: A Hidden Piece of Fibromyalgia Pain

Fascia: A Hidden Piece of the Puzzle of Fibromyalgia Pain – Fibro News Daily | April 25, 2017 | By Ginevra Liptan, MD

Many studies have shown that the fibromyalgia nervous system has become sensitized and therefore has overactive responses resulting in pain.

This is the target of the three FDA approved medications for this illness, and these medications can indeed be helpful—usually resulting in about 30 percent reduction of pain.

In my experience, both as someone with the illness personally and as a physician treating fibromyalgia, utilizing these medications alone is inadequate.  Continue reading

Combating Wear and Tear on Our Collagen

Combating Wear and Tear on Our Collagen – University of Utah – Mar-2017

This article explains much of what causes our pain from EDS. With our defective collagen, even small stresses can cause “sub-failure damage” which accumulates until the tissue fails completely.

University of Utah bioengineers detect early signs of damage in connective tissues such as ligaments, tendons and cartilage

By the time someone realizes they damaged a ligament, tendon or cartilage from too much exercise or other types of physical activity, it’s too late. The tissue is stretched and torn and the person is writhing in pain.
Continue reading

Pain in Ehlers-Danlos syndromes

Pain in Ehlers-Danlos syndromes: manifestations, therapeutic strategies and future perspectives: Expert Opinion on Orphan Drugs: Vol 4, No 11 – Marco Castori  – 20 Sep 2016

Introduction: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) groups together an increasing number of hereditary soft connective tissue disorders.

Among the most common variants, the hypermobility type emerges as the most problematic, due to

  1. clinical similarities with the joint hypermobility syndrome,
  2. strong association with pain and lack of molecular confirmatory tests.

To date, chronic pain and the related physical disability are the most relevant clinical issues in the long-term management of EDS.   Continue reading

The fascial (connective tissue) system

Clinical and symptomatological reflections: the fascial system – J Multidiscip Healthc. 2014 – free full-text PMC article

Every body structure is wrapped in connective tissue, or fascia, creating a structural continuity that gives form and function to every tissue and organ.

Currently, there is still little information on the functions and interactions between the fascial continuum and the body system; unfortunately, in medical literature there are few texts explaining how fascial stasis or altered movement of the various connective layers can generate a clinical problem

Certainly, the fascia plays a significant role in conveying mechanical tension, in order to control an inflammatory environment.   Continue reading