Tag Archives: DANGER

World’s most Popular Painkiller is Hazardous to Health

World’s most popular painkiller poses risk with long-term use: study | CTV News – Mar 2015

I find it baffling that despite knowing for years how damaging this drug can be, I read about it being recommended for just about any pain, anywhere, any time.

Doctors may be under-estimating the risks to patients from long-term use of paracetamol, also known as acetaminophen, the world’s most popular painkiller, researchers said Tuesday.

Chronic users of the drug — people who typically take large, daily doses over several years — may increase their risk of death, or kidney, intestinal and heart problems, they found.

So why is it still being pushed on patients at every turn?  Continue reading

Counterfeit prescription pills made of fentanyl

Counterfeit prescription pills made of fentanyl are killing Americans: DEA – ABC News – By Samara Lynn – Nov 2019 

The Drug Enforcement Administration issued a warning on Monday about counterfeit prescription pills, saying the pills are “killing Americans.”

Perhaps if the DEA allowed patients to access their usual pain-relieving medications, they wouldn’t need to get them from the black market.

“Mexican drug cartels are manufacturing mass quantities of counterfeit prescription pills containing fentanyl,” according to a press release from the DEA.   Continue reading

Risk of Opioid Medication Discontinuation

Opioid medication discontinuation and risk of adverse opioid-related health care events. – PubMed 2019 Aug

Between 2012 and 2017, the United States dramatically reduced opioid prescribing rates.

While this may be appropriate given the opioid epidemic, there has been little research to guide the clinical practice of discontinuing patients from opioid medications and opioid death rates have continued to increase.

These forced tapers have been a horrible experiment on thousands of people, enacted without any knowledge of what the outcome might be.   Continue reading

Fluoroquinolones and Peripheral Neuropathy

Association Between Peripheral Neuropathy and Exposure to Oral Fluoroquinolone or Amoxicillin-Clavulanate Therapy | Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology | JAMA Neurology – April 2019

I’m starting to believe that antibiotics affect far more of our bodies than we ever imagined. We already know about the potential tendon ruptures, but it seems we’re discovering more significant side-effects over time.

Findings  This nested case-control study of 5357 incident peripheral neuropathy cases and 17 285 matched controls showed that current use of systemic fluoroquinolone antibiotics increased the risk of peripheral neuropathy by 47%, causing an additional 2.4 cases per 10 000 patients per year of current use.

Risk appeared to be greater with cumulative exposure, among men, and among those older than 60 years of age but was not significantly associated with amoxicillin-clavulanate.   Continue reading

Fluoroquinolones Overprescribed Despite Dangers

Fluoroquinolones Overprescribed Despite Dangers – Matt McMillen – Feb 2019

This is the strongest warning I’ve seen about these common antibiotics and it makes me wonder why they don’t mention it to us when the drugs are prescribed.

In 2006, Rachel Brummert developed a sinus infection, and her doctor prescribed Levaquin, one of a class of powerful antibiotics called fluoroquinolones.

Shortly after she began taking the drug, she went on an errand. While crossing a parking lot, her Achilles tendon ruptured. Her foot went limp. The agony felt unbearable.   Continue reading

Toxicity of gadolinium (MRI contrast) to the brain

8 things we now know about the toxicity of gadolinium to the brain – The Neurology Lounge – May 26, 2018 – Ibrahim Imam

When it comes to imaging the nervous system, nothing but an MRI will do for the fastidious neurologist.

CT has its uses, such as in detecting acute intracranial bleeding, but it lacks the sophistication to detect or differentiate between less glaring abnormalities. It also comes with a hefty radiation dose.

MRI on the other hand, relying on powerful magnetic fields, is a ‘cleaner’ technology.  Continue reading

Some antiepileptic drugs increase risk of dementia 

Antiepileptic drugs increase risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia – Science Daily – April 2018 – University of Eastern Finland

The use of [some] antiepileptic drugs is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, DZNE.

Continuous use of antiepileptic drugs for a period exceeding one year was associated with a 15 percent increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease in the Finnish dataset, and with a 30 percent increased risk of dementia in the German dataset.

This is the class of drugs we are being coerced to take instead of opioids despite the fact that opioids have far fewer side effects.   Continue reading

Epidural Steroids Associated With Decreased Bone Density

Epidural Steroid Injections Associated With Decreased Bone Mineral Density, Increased Risk for Vertebral Fracture – Jessica Martin – January 25, 2018

Another reason to avoid epidural injections for pain:

In this systematic review and critical literature appraisal, researchers evaluated 8 studies (n=7233) that reported on the effects of epidural steroid injections on bone mineral density, osteoporosis, vertebral fracture, or osteopenia.

Across all studies, mean changes in bone mineral density ranged from 0.06% to 1.25% in the lumbar spine and from −2.87% to 0.45% in the femoral neck.   Continue reading

FDA Safety alert for MRI Contrast Agents

Drug Safety Communication on Gadolinium Contrast Agents | Drug Topics – December 20, 2017

The FDA has issued a drug safety communication about gadolinium-based contrast agents used in MRIs. It is requiring a new class warning and other safety measures for these products.

This is not the first time this issue has arisen:

Continue reading

Warning: Persistent Post-Surgical Pain Common

Persistent Postsurgical Pain – Practical Pain Management

Surgery is often counterproductive for chronic pain, so beware!

More than 45 million surgical procedures are performed in the United States each year. It has been estimated that acute postoperative pain will develop into persistent postoperative pain (PPP) in 10% to 50% of individuals after common operations.

Since chronic pain can be severe in up to 10% of these patients, PPP represents a major clinical problem—affecting at least 450,000 people each year.  Continue reading