Tag Archives: depression

Fast-Acting Depression Drug Approved

Fast-Acting Depression Drug, Newly Approved, Could Help MillionsBy Benedict CareyMar 2019

This is wonderful news because it’s from a different drug class than what’s been available.

This new approach brings fresh hope for those of us who have been hanging on, gritting our teeth, and tolerating our treatment-resistant depression because we can’t get sufficient relief from the current medications.

A nasal spray version of the drug ketamine has shown promise as an antidepressant, even if its properties still aren’t well understood. Continue reading

SSRIs Inhibit Effectiveness of Common Opioid

Common opioids less effective for patients on SSRI antidepressants, study finds – February 6, 2019 by Stanford University Medical Center

I’m reposting this because I accidentally scheduled it for a date before it even existed, so here it is if you missed it the first time around:

Patients taking the most common form of antidepressant who are given the most widely prescribed opioid experience less pain relief, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have discovered. As many as 1 in 6 Americans takes antidepressants, mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

Stanford researchers found that SSRIs reduce the effectiveness of hydrocodone and codeine, which are often prescribed to patients who have recently undergone surgery.   Continue reading

Common opioids less effective for patients on SSRIs

Common opioids less effective for patients on SSRI antidepressants, study finds – February 6, 2019 by Stanford University Medical Center

Patients taking the most common form of antidepressant who are given the most widely prescribed opioid experience less pain relief, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have discovered. As many as 1 in 6 Americans takes antidepressants, mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

Stanford researchers found that SSRIs reduce the effectiveness of hydrocodone and codeine, which are often prescribed to patients who have recently undergone surgery.   Continue reading

Complications of Uncontrolled, Persistent Pain

Complications of Uncontrolled, Persistent Pain – By Forest Tennant, MD, DrPH – Jan 2018

To the unfortunate patient who is afflicted and the practitioner who treats it, incurable, persistent pain is truly its own disease regardless of its underlying cause.

Persistent pain, which is also often characterized as chronic or intractable, has all the ramifications of a disease in that it may have pre-clinical and overt phases.

I like that he calls it “persistent pain” instead of “chronic pain”, a term which has become synonymous in the public’s eye as a whining, complaining, catastrophizing, gonna-be addict.    Continue reading

Depression treatment needs overhaul

Depression treatment needs overhaul – by Tess Redgrave, University of Auckland

This is an interesting article that proposes 12 categories of depression, with different symptoms and requiring different treatment.

The way depression is diagnosed and treated needs a major overhaul, say authors of a new review article in the scientific journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.

This is because current treatment of depression is ineffective and lacks a plausible, coherent theoretical basis, they claim.

A new theory for depression and its treatment is proposed in the articleDepression subtyping based on evolutionary psychiatry: Proximate mechanisms and ultimate functions,”  Continue reading

Chronic Pain, Depression & Antidepressants

Managing Chronic Pain, Depression & Antidepressants: Issues & Relationships – Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center – by Michael Clark, M.D., M.P.H. – 1995, updated August 15, 2017

Signs, Symptoms, and Prevalence

In several studies of patients presenting to clinics specializing in the evaluation of pain, the prevalence of psychiatric conditions was systematically assessed.

Affective and anxiety disorders were the most commonly found (Reich et al. 1983). For example, the prevalence of major depression in patients with chronic low back pain is 3-4 times greater than in the general population (Sullivan et al. 1992). However, the causal relationship between these syndromes remains controversial.    Continue reading

Emotional Impact of Pain

Emotional Impact of Pain | Pain Management & Understanding | Arthritis.org

Although it may feel like it’s coming from your joints, pain – particularly the chronic pain common to arthritis – is also an expression of your state of mind.

If you’re depressed or anxious, you’ll very likely hurt more than when your mood is lighter or more balanced.

The crucial distinction is that depression or anxiety will only worsen *pre-existing* pain, not create new pain.

The fact that pain itself is depressing and worrying only makes the problem worse.  Continue reading

Depression in chronic pain: opioids responsible?

This article made a big splash arguing that opioids, and not the pain we take them for, cause our depression.

Depression in chronic pain: might opioids be responsible? : PAIN – M.D. Sullivan and D.N. Juurlink – Nov 2018

Of course, the answer is “NO”, but this low-quality study with specious claims of “causal inference” tries to show a causal relationship that cannot be proven.

As usual, they are looking only at opioids with little concern for chronic pain, but if we substitute the words “chronic pain” everywhere they say “opioids” these studies make a lot more sense.   Continue reading

Urine Test Could Diagnose Depression, Anxiety

Urine Test Could Diagnose Depression, Anxiety | American Council on Science and Health – By Alex Berezow — September 29, 2018

This seems like a hugely significant discovery that could save the healthcare system a lot of money treating people for suspected mental disorders when there is not psychological problem at all.

Depression and anxiety are not always easy to detect. The obvious symptoms, such as persistent sadness or worry, may not be present.

Instead, a person may exhibit insidious symptoms, like chronic indecision or excessive sleepiness. Diagnosis usually requires a psychologist. Besides being time consuming and inconvenient, diagnostic criteria are rather subjective. Continue reading

Genetic tests for antidepressant effectiveness?

Can genetic tests gauge how well antidepressants will work?By Rebecca Robbins @rebeccadrobbins – September 28, 2018

It can be notoriously difficult for psychiatrists and patients to determine which antidepressant might be most effective, or which might cause side effects.

And so Color Genomics, a company that already sells genetic tests to determine someone’s risk of developing certain cancers, said this week that it will also begin to offer a DNA test to determine how well widely used antidepressants are likely to work for patients.

With the new test2 (part of a $249 product), Color joins several dozen companies probing patients’ DNA in search of insights to help inform decisions about which psychiatry medications patients should take.  Continue reading