Tag Archives: depression

Who responds to psych treatments for pain?

Who responds well to psychologically-based treatments for chronic pain? – June 5, 2018

How do we know whether a patient is likely to do well in the psychologically-based treatment we offer them? The truth is, at least for the moment, we don’t.

I work with patients with chronic pain and quite regularly feel that I have a “sense” early on about who is likely to engage well and make changes in treatment. Surely there must be some way of quantifying this?  

This is the problem with science: everything must be quantified, yet nothing about pain and its treatment can be reliably counted. Pain has quality, not quantity. Continue reading

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EDS/Hypermobility linked to psychiatric disorders

Below are three PubMed studies from 2015 about the detrimental effects of EDS on the mind/brain:

Joint hypermobility and the heritable disorders of connective tissue: clinical and empirical evidence of links with psychiatry. – PubMed – NCBIGen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Jan-Feb

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The heritable disorders of connective tissue (HDCTs) are a group of genetic disorders affecting connective tissue matrix proteins.   Continue reading

EDS Associated with Anxiety and Depression

Below are 4 articles from PubMed that show EDS is associated with anxiety, depression, and other disorders of the central nervous system, like fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome.

Connective tissue is *everywhere* in our bodies (yes, including our bones), so the defects in our body tissues extend to the brain as well.

I’ve been plagued by periods of desperate anxiety for the last decade and periods of suicidal depression for all my adult life, so I’m not surprised that the instability and slackness of our bodies are also manifested in our psychology. My moods never feel stable and can easily be derailed.

The number of possible EDS symptoms seems infinite…    Continue reading

Pain as a risk factor for common mental disorders

Pain as a risk factor for common mental disorders. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2: a longitudinal, population-based study – PAIN: April 2018

I’ve read too many articles that insinuate chronic pain arises from pre-existing mental issues and claim the focus should be on the mental disorder more than the pain. (This is part of the popular idea of “catastrophizing“)

But this article makes it clear that pain leads to “psychological” disorders, not the other way around as many would like us to believe. It is known that the unremitting assault by pain is a form of chronic stress that damages brain structure and connectivity.   Continue reading

Not pain, but ‘existential distress’ leads to suicide

It’s not pain but ‘existential distress’ that leads people to assisted suicide, study suggests – The Washington Post – May 2017

I don’t see how to separate our lifelong chronic pain from existential pain. Pain that will never “get better” will have a strong effect on a person’s experience and view of their own existence.

A few decades ago, doctor-assisted suicide was considered a fringe idea despite surveys showing many physicians supported the idea under certain circumstances.

While doctor-assisted suicide remains a polarizing issue, some countries and states have begun to accept it. Continue reading

Anti-Inflammatories for Depression?

The Depression Puzzle: Are Anti-inflammatories Better Than Anti-depressants? An ME/CFS and FM Perspective – Health Rising

Both depression and inflammation may be present in both chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM).

Antidepressants can help some but not others.

Evidence that inflammation may cause depression in as many as 40% of depressed patients suggests that anti-inflammatories might be better at mood elevation for some ME/CFS/FM patients than antidepressants.  Continue reading

It is what it is

https://aeon.co/essays/this-is-why-cognitive-behavioural-therapy-works-so-well

Whether we feel happy, engaged and full of energy is derived from the belief that we are in harmony with the world around us.

We maintain this sense of harmony by viewing ourselves, others and the events around us in a relatively benign light: things are fine, we’re safe.

When we perceive the slings and arrows of life as non-events – when we can say: ‘It is what it is’ – we can face difficult circumstances and effectively disarm potential emotional landmines. Continue reading

3 Minute Depression Test & Screening

3 Minute Depression Test & Screening. Get Instant Results – Based on the Depression Screening Test by Ivan Goldberg, M.D. – By Arnold Lieber, MD – Oct 2017

According to the NIMH Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting more than 15 million adults in the United States (~6.7% of the population).  Take this self-assessment test to see if you may be someone who could benefit from the treatment and support of a mental health professional.

The above quiz is based on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). If you think you may be suffering from Depression, PsyCom strongly recommends that you seek help from a doctor in order to receive a proper diagnosis and support.

Online Therapy Raises Plenty Of Ethical Questions

Online Therapy Shows Promise But Raises Plenty Of Ethical Questions – May 2017 – by Jessica Goodheart

For pain patients who have trouble transporting themselves to the weekly appointments required for therapy, this could be a solution. However, I have doubts about how effective it could be for the supposed “catastrophizing” for which we are urged to seek therapy.

These were some of the “success stories” posted this month on the website of Sunnyvale-based BetterHelp, one of a handful of online therapy companies that substitutes the often hard-to-access office visit to a therapist’s office with a suite of online offerings.

Many who need mental health care can’t afford it, while many regions suffer a severe shortage of mental health professionals, and even in counties rich with therapists, many lack the time to make the visit.   Continue reading

Half of “low intensity” CBT clients relapse within 12 months

False economy? Half of “low intensity” CBT clients relapse within 12 months – By Christian Jarrett

Heralded as a revolution in mental health care – a cost-effective way to deliver evidence-based psychological help to large numbers – low-intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recommended by NICE, the independent health advisory body in England and Wales, for mild to moderate depression and anxiety.

Prior studies into its effectiveness have been promising. However, little research has looked at whether the benefits last.

A new study in Behaviour Research and Therapy has done that, following a cohort of people with depression and anxiety over time.   Continue reading