Tag Archives: depression

Chronic Pain Among Suicide Decedents

Chronic Pain Among Suicide Decedents, 2003 to 2014 | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians – Sept 2018

The CDC finally looks at suicide and chronic pain:

“increases in opioid availability are not associated with greater suicide risk from opioid overdose among patients with chronic pain.”

During 2003 to 2014, the NVDRS identified 123,181 suicide decedents aged 10 years or older, 10,789 (8.8%) of whom had evidence of chronic pain. The percentage of decedents with chronic pain increased from 7.4% in 2003 to 10.2% in 2014, but the percentage who died by opioid overdose remained low overall (<2.0%).   Continue reading

Ketamine’s antidepressive effects tied to opioid system in brain

Ketamine’s antidepressive effects tied to opioid system in brain – By Kimber Price – Aug 2018

Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that ketamine works as an antidepressant at least in part by activating the brain’s opioid system.

The finding overturns previously held beliefs that the drug’s antidepressant effects stemmed solely from its impact on the glutamate system.

These beliefs led to the widespread use of ketamine to treat depression and spurred the development of glutamate-blocking drugs for use as antidepressants.   Continue reading

Why do people kill themselves?

Why do people kill themselves? – KevinMD.com – March 2017 – by Greg Smith, MD

I use an ongoing spreadsheet to keep track of and to report my demographics and stats for each telepsychiatry consult shift I do. We have now gone over thirty thousand consults as a group.

It never ceases to amaze me, as I fire up my computer, log on to my systems and bring up the spreadsheet for the shift ahead, that one column is remarkably uniform and consistent, sometimes for days at a time: SI.

SI stands for suicidal ideation. And that is one of the most common chief psychiatric complaints we see in the emergency department. Continue reading

Who responds to psych treatments for pain?

Who responds well to psychologically-based treatments for chronic pain? – June 5, 2018

How do we know whether a patient is likely to do well in the psychologically-based treatment we offer them? The truth is, at least for the moment, we don’t.

I work with patients with chronic pain and quite regularly feel that I have a “sense” early on about who is likely to engage well and make changes in treatment. Surely there must be some way of quantifying this?  

This is the problem with science: everything must be quantified, yet nothing about pain and its treatment can be reliably counted. Pain has quality, not quantity. Continue reading

EDS/Hypermobility linked to psychiatric disorders

Below are three PubMed studies from 2015 about the detrimental effects of EDS on the mind/brain:

Joint hypermobility and the heritable disorders of connective tissue: clinical and empirical evidence of links with psychiatry. – PubMed – NCBIGen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Jan-Feb

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The heritable disorders of connective tissue (HDCTs) are a group of genetic disorders affecting connective tissue matrix proteins.   Continue reading

EDS Associated with Anxiety and Depression

Below are 4 articles from PubMed that show EDS is associated with anxiety, depression, and other disorders of the central nervous system, like fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome.

Connective tissue is *everywhere* in our bodies (yes, including our bones), so the defects in our body tissues extend to the brain as well.

I’ve been plagued by periods of desperate anxiety for the last decade and periods of suicidal depression for all my adult life, so I’m not surprised that the instability and slackness of our bodies are also manifested in our psychology. My moods never feel stable and can easily be derailed.

The number of possible EDS symptoms seems infinite…    Continue reading

Pain as a risk factor for common mental disorders

Pain as a risk factor for common mental disorders. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2: a longitudinal, population-based study – PAIN: April 2018

I’ve read too many articles that insinuate chronic pain arises from pre-existing mental issues and claim the focus should be on the mental disorder more than the pain. (This is part of the popular idea of “catastrophizing“)

But this article makes it clear that pain leads to “psychological” disorders, not the other way around as many would like us to believe. It is known that the unremitting assault by pain is a form of chronic stress that damages brain structure and connectivity.   Continue reading

Not pain, but ‘existential distress’ leads to suicide

It’s not pain but ‘existential distress’ that leads people to assisted suicide, study suggests – The Washington Post – May 2017

I don’t see how to separate our lifelong chronic pain from existential pain. Pain that will never “get better” will have a strong effect on a person’s experience and view of their own existence.

A few decades ago, doctor-assisted suicide was considered a fringe idea despite surveys showing many physicians supported the idea under certain circumstances.

While doctor-assisted suicide remains a polarizing issue, some countries and states have begun to accept it. Continue reading

Anti-Inflammatories for Depression?

The Depression Puzzle: Are Anti-inflammatories Better Than Anti-depressants? An ME/CFS and FM Perspective – Health Rising

Both depression and inflammation may be present in both chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM).

Antidepressants can help some but not others.

Evidence that inflammation may cause depression in as many as 40% of depressed patients suggests that anti-inflammatories might be better at mood elevation for some ME/CFS/FM patients than antidepressants.  Continue reading

It is what it is

https://aeon.co/essays/this-is-why-cognitive-behavioural-therapy-works-so-well

Whether we feel happy, engaged and full of energy is derived from the belief that we are in harmony with the world around us.

We maintain this sense of harmony by viewing ourselves, others and the events around us in a relatively benign light: things are fine, we’re safe.

When we perceive the slings and arrows of life as non-events – when we can say: ‘It is what it is’ – we can face difficult circumstances and effectively disarm potential emotional landmines. Continue reading