Tag Archives: depression

Overview of Depression Mgmt during Pain

Depression Management during the Presence of Pain: An Overview – January 20, 2015 – free full text article

Depression and anxiety are frequently associated with increased risk of medical problems. The severity of these problems varies from persistent pain to severe cardiovascular illness.

The pathophysiology of chronic pain and depression overlap in the noradrenergic and serotonergic pathways.

Antidepressants, especially dual acting which affect both pathways, are a frequent and effective choice of treatment for chronic pain.

The effectiveness of antidepressants for pain has not been proven and many pain patients get zero relief from them, including me.n Continue reading

The Link Between Opioids and Unemployment

The Link Between Opioids and Unemployment –  OLGA KHAZAN – Apr 18, 2017

Since 1990, drug overdose deaths have increased by 500 percent.

A new study suggests unemployment might be one of the factors behind that dramatic rise. The paper, published by NBER last week, finds that:

As the unemployment rate increases by one percentage point in a given county,

  • the opioid-death-rate rises by 3.6 percent, and 
  • emergency room visits rise by 7 percent.  

Continue reading

Depression rates rise 18 percent in a decade

‘Let’s Talk’, WHO says, as depression rates rise 18 percent in a decade| Reuters – Mar 30, 2017 – By Kate Kelland

Depression is now the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday, with more than 300 million people suffering.

Rates of depression have risen by
more than 18 percent since 2005

WHO expressed concern that in many countries there is little or no support for people with mental health disorders, and said only around half of people with depression get treatment in wealthier nations.

On average just 3 percent of government health budgets is spent on mental health, varying from less than 1 percent in poor countries to 5 percent in rich ones, according to the WHO.

 

Borderline Personality Disorder: Shortage of Endogenous Opioids?

Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?Psychological ReviewResearchGate – April 2010 – free PDF Download Available

The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed.

Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids constitute part of the underlying pathophysiology of BPD.

This is a radical idea, but I’ve read it before: certain psychological states in certain people can be relieved by opioids. However, even if this proves to be true, we certainly won’t be prescribed this particular drug, no matter how effective it is at easing mental disorders since it’s not even being used for physical pain anymore.  Continue reading

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for inflammation

I stumbled upon this first article pointing out the various possible benefits of the supplement, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), because it reduces inflammation. This made me curious, so I checked for studies of it in PubMed (2 of which are annotated later in this post) and found the article was correct in its assertions.

Problems? I Have a NAC for That | Psychology Today

NAC is not only the treatment for mucus build-up in cystic fibrosis, but also acetaminophen overdose, perhaps to reduce the kidney toxicity of contrast dye (though that doesn’t seem to be holding up), in interstitial lung disease, and investigationally in reduction of noise-induced hearing loss, lessening the destruction of pancreatic beta cells, curing a hangover, and decreasing symptoms of the flu.   Continue reading

Depression impairs your ability to think

More than sad: Depression affects your ability to think – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publications May 06, 2016, James Cartreine, PhD,

depression can actually change your ability to think.

It can impair your attention and memory, as well as your information processing and decision-making skills.

It can also lower your cognitive flexibility (the ability to adapt your goals and strategies to changing situations) and executive functioning (the ability to take all the steps to get something done)   Continue reading

New Depression Treatment Shows Immediate Results

New treatment for depression shows immediate results | Harvard Gazette

Individuals with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder who receive low-field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) show immediate and substantial mood improvement,

LFMS is unlike any current treatment.

It uses magnetic fields that are a fraction of the strength but at a higher frequency than the electromagnetic fields used in TMS [transcranial magnetic stimulation] and ECT [electroconvulsive therapy],

Importantly, LFMS appears to have an immediate effect on mood and thus has the potential to provide relief in emergency situations,   Continue reading

Working Memory Role in Emotional Regulation

When the going gets negative, recruit working memory — ScienceDaily — November 21, 2016

Working memory, the ability to process information, may play an important role in coping with negative life events, according to a new study by Dr. Tracy Alloway, associate professor of psychology at the University of North Florida.

“There is a growing body of research supporting the role of working memory in emotional regulation.”

We know that

  1. those with clinical depression have difficulties in suppressing irrelevant negative information, while
  2. those with high working memory are able to ignore negative emotions.   Continue reading

Couples Becomes Biologically More Alike Over Time

Couples’ Physical Health Becomes More Alike Over Time : Shots – Health News : NPR – May 22, 2016 by Lindsay Peterson

We think of aging as something we do alone, the changes unfolding according to each person’s own traits and experiences. But researchers are learning that as we age in relationships, we change biologically to become more like our partners than we were in the beginning.

“You’re in an environment together, and you’re appraising that environment together, and making decisions together.” And through that process, you become linked physically, not just emotionally.

It’s like finishing each other’s sentences, but it’s your muscles and cells that are operating in sync.

knowing about one partner’s health can provide key clues about the other’s. For instance, signs of muscle weakening or kidney trouble in one may indicate similar problems for the other.

Mejia and her colleagues have found striking similarities between partners who have spent decades together, especially in

  • kidney function,
  • total cholesterol levels and
  • the strength of their grips,

which is a key predictor of mortality.

One obvious reason for partner similarity is that people often choose partners who are like them — people from the same stock, with similar backgrounds. But that didn’t explain why there were more similarities between the long-time partners, compared to the others.

When they accounted for the effect of partner choice, they found that the biological similarities persisted, based on markers in blood tests.

They also found that the effects crossed over from the mental to the physical.

In other words, increases in feelings of depression in one spouse led to more daily task limitations in the other.

But the news in these partner studies is not all bad.

William Chopik, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University, has found evidence of the power of optimism. He and his research colleagues studied optimism, in addition to health and activity limitations, in 2,758 older couples in a national dataset.

The researchers found that over a four-year period, when one partner’s optimism increased, the other partner experienced fewer illnesses such as diabetes and arthritis compared to people whose partners did not become more optimistic

These investigations of how couples affect each other’s health are relatively new, particularly the research into the biological changes, and the researchers are still searching for explanations.

Nevertheless, they say, the implications for health care are clear. People in relationships don’t experience chronic health problems on their own.

When a spouse comes in with a problem, the other spouse could be part of the cause — or the solution.

Author: Lindsay Peterson is a graduate student and freelance science writer in Tampa, Fla.  

LInks between Chronic Pain, Anxiety, and Depression

Association of Depression and Anxiety Alone and in Combination with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in Primary Care Patients – Psychosom Med. 2008 Oct; – free full-text PMC article

Objective:
To assess the relationship between depression and anxiety comorbidity on pain intensity, pain-related disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQL).

INTRODUCTION

Pain is a significant public health problem, with a third (1) to more than half (2) of adults in population-based surveys suffering from chronic or recurrent pain.  

Pain is the most pervasive symptom reported in the community and primary care setting (3–5) and accounts for nearly 20% of all ambulatory visits in the US (6).   Continue reading