Tag Archives: EDS

Interoceptive Sensitivity and Emotional Experience

Interoceptive Sensitivity and Self-Reports of Emotional Experience – free full-text /PMC1224728/ – Sep 2005

I’m interested in how my anxiety relates to my EDS, so I plowed through this long article. It appears that “interoceptive sensitivity” (which is usually extreme in people with EDS) seems to be not just a discrete biomarker but also a driver of anxiety (a strong arousal focus).

People differ in the extent to which they emphasize feelings of activation or deactivation in their verbal reports of experienced emotion, termed arousal focus (AF).

Two multimethod studies indicate that AF is linked to heightened interoceptive sensitivity (as measured by performance on a heartbeat detection task).   Continue reading

Neurovisceral expression of psychiatric symptoms

Neurovisceral phenotypes in the expression of psychiatric symptoms | Autonomic Neuroscience | Review ARTICLE |February 2015 (modified repost from 2/6/16)

This review supports what I’ve long suspected: it’s not just my body that’s hypermobile, but my emotions as well. There’s evidence that collagen disorders affect much more than joints due to the altered biochemical properties of this protein that’s ubiquitous in our bodies.

This review explores the proposal that vulnerability to psychological symptoms, particularly anxiety, originates in constitutional differences in the control of bodily state, exemplified by a set of conditions that include Joint Hypermobility, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope.

Research is revealing how brain-body mechanisms underlie individual differences in psychophysiological reactivity that can be important for predicting, stratifying and treating individuals with anxiety disorders and related conditions.  Continue reading

Joint Hypermobility -> Anxiety in Dogs too

First evidence for an association between joint hypermobility and excitability in a non-human species, the domestic dog – Free full-text /PMC6565730/ – Jun 2019

There is a well-established relationship between joint hypermobility and anxiety in humans, that has not previously been investigated in other species.

A population of 5575 assistance dogs were scored for both hip hypermobility and 13 behaviour characteristics using previously validated methods.

Our results suggest a positive association between hip joint hypermobility and emotional arousal in domestic dogs, which parallel results found in people.    Continue reading

Enhanced Interoception Links EDS and Anxiety

How Enhanced Interoception links EDS and Anxiety  – Wikipedia

I wasn’t aware of the complexity involved in “feeling what I’m feeling”, so I’m posting relevant parts of this extensive article.

Knowing a bit about interoception is critical to understanding how a disorder of the connective tissue like EDS can result in altered emotions, mostly anxiety, through biochemical processes.

Interoception is contemporarily defined as the sense of the internal state of the body.   Continue reading

Link between anxiety and joint hypermobility

Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility – May 2014

This study makes connections between the acute perception of our internal body states, which trigger excessive activation of our amygdala, with anxiety.

In lay terms, we are too sensitive and too responsive, thus unable to hold life’s rougher times at an arm’s distance. It’s as though we lack the protective barrier built into the “hardware” of most people to shield them from the extremes of their environment.

Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased “interoceptive” sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal.   Continue reading

Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility

Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type:… – PubMed – NCBI: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised. – Mar 2015 – partial repost from Latest EDS Research: March 2015

Having suffered from crippling anxiety in episodes lasting for days to weeks, I started researching, hoping to find some clues for new treatments. Instead, I found numerous studies showing that my anxiety is probably another “symptom” of my EDS and thus “incurable”.

This is just another painful feeling (in addition to physical pain) that I’m doomed to suffer for the rest of my life.

Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome – JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals.

Continue reading

Ehlers Danlos Syndromes Toolkit

Ehlers Danlos Syndromes Toolkit– from the British “Royal College of General Practitioners” – accessed June 2019

This is an excellent resource describing the many and varied problematic symptoms of a life with EDS, including descriptions of the “lived experience”.

The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are heritable connective tissue disorders affecting the quality of collagen in every part of the body. 

Too many people believe that EDS is only about “frequent joint dislocations”, which is what I encountered when I first researched it in the early 1990’s – and when “research” involved books and libraries.  Continue reading

Advances in Hormonal Pain Care

3 Advances in Hormonal Pain Care — Pain News NetworkBy Forest Tennant, MD – Mar 2019

There are three new discoveries or innovations in hormonal pain care that I dearly love. I believe they are real trend-setters, but keep in mind that the “next big thing” may not endure.  

Hormone Derivative Treatment

There are two hormonal derivatives that, in my hands, have been extremely beneficial to sub-groups of chronic pain patients.

The first is medroxyprogesterone, which is a derivative of progesterone. In my experience, medroxyprogesterone is far more potent in treating intractable pain patients than is plain progesterone.   Continue reading

Invasive Surgery to Relieve Chronic Pain?

Invasive Surgery: Effective in Relieving Chronic Pain? By Sunali Wadehra, MD – Feb 2019

Invasive surgery may not be any more effective than sham procedures in reducing chronic pain, according to a meta analysis published by Wayne B. Jonas, MD, in Pain Medicine last September.

Dr. Jonas and his team performed a systematic review of 25 randomized controlled trials published between 1959 and 2013, involving 2,000 patients undergoing surgery for chronic pain.

This article explains a concept I haven’t seen elsewhere: chronic pain versus protracted pain. Especially in the case of EDS, this means we can hurt every day, but still not have true “chronic pain”. Continue reading