Tag Archives: exercise

Low Energy Production and Pain in Fibromyalgia

Low Energy Production and Pain in Fibromyalgia – Is Your Microcirculation To Blame? – Health Rising – https://www.healthrising.org – by Cort Johnson | May 25, 2014

Exercise is highly recommended as an adjunct therapy in fibromyalgia. 

Those of us with fibromyalgia know how extremely difficult this becomes. Our bodies seem to resist us with all their might and this article offers a possible explanation.

A 2010 review of exercise studies found that ‘slight to moderate’ intensity aerobic exercise sessions done two to three times a week worked best, and that appropriate levels of exercise result in improved fitness but only modestly improved pain.   Continue reading

Can Pain Be Used to Treat Pain?

Can Pain Be Used to Treat Pain? — Pain News Network – By Jeanne McArdle – Apr 2019

“Can you cure pain with more pain?” was the provocative question posed last month by National Public Radio’s Invisibilia podcast, “The Fifth Vital Sign.”

The show features the story of Devyn, a 16-year old former gymnast living with chronic pain.

Devyn broke the end of her thighbone and required surgery, but the injury never fully healed and her pain was spreading.   Continue reading

Evidence summary for non-opioid pain mgmt

Noninvasive Nonpharmacological Treatment for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review –  a thorough 23-page PDF document from AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality)

Scope and Key Questions

This Comparative Effectiveness Review focused on noninvasive nonpharmacological therapy, with a Key Question (KQ) for each of five common chronic pain conditions:

  • KQ 1: Chronic low back pain
  • KQ 2: Chronic neck pain
  • KQ 3: Osteoarthritis (knee, hip, hand)
  • KQ 4: Fibromyalgia
  • KQ 5: Chronic tension headache

Sadly, there’s no mention of pain caused by genetic disorders, like EDS or sickle cell.   Continue reading

Exercise Not a Panacea for Chronic Pain

Physical activity and exercise for chronic pain in adults: an overview of Cochrane Reviews. – PubMed – Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017 Jan

For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity. However, exercise may have specific benefits in reducing the severity of chronic pain, as well as more general benefits associated with improved overall physical and mental health, and physical functioning.

Physical activity and exercise programmes are increasingly being promoted and offered in various healthcare systems, and for a variety of chronic pain conditions.

It is therefore important at this stage to establish the efficacy and safety of these programmes, and furthermore to address the critical factors that determine their success or failure.

So all this exercise and activity has been pushed on pain patients, but no one has done studies to show that the blanket recommendation to exercise has been beneficial? Continue reading

When walking makes your legs hurt

When walking makes your legs hurt – Harvard Health – Aug 2018

Experts used to stress the benefits of heavy-duty aerobic exercise — the kind that makes you breathe hard and gets your heart going. But the message changed to moderation after a number of studies showed that physical activity that’s far less taxing is associated with lower rates of heart disease, some cancers, and several other illnesses — if it’s done regularly.

Plain old walking usually tops the moderate-intensity exercise list because it’s easy, convenient, and free, and it requires minimal equipment — a comfortable pair of shoes

The trouble is that walking isn’t so easy for everyone. Indeed, it’s agony for many.   Continue reading

Why Sitting May Be Bad for Your Brain

Why Sitting May Be Bad for Your Brain – By Gretchen Reynolds – Aug. 15, 2018

Sitting for hours without moving can slow the flow of blood to our brains, according to a cautionary new study of office workers, a finding that could have implications for long-term brain health.

But getting up and strolling for just two minutes every half-hour seems to stave off this decline in brain blood flow and may even increase it.

That sounds so reasonable and almost trivial until you try it yourself.   Continue reading

Overcoming Neck Pain with Exercises

Overcoming Chronic Neck Pain: Postural Causes and A Unique Exercise Fix | Home – http://fixtheneck.com

I’ve learned that some of my pain of musculoskeletal origin can be ameliorated by strengthening weaker muscles and aligning my spine better.

For years, I had a severe problem with recurring cervicogenic headaches, which were probably caused by a pinch somewhere in my hypermobile cervical spine. But after doing Isometric exercises with my neck my vertebrae realign properly and I don’t get the headaches anymore.

This author, Rochelle Cocco has created a whole website describing exactly what she learned and did to surmount her own crippling neck pain. Continue reading

No benefit from excessive high-intensity exercise

New Research Sparks Call for Guidelines Around High-Intensity Interval Training – Jun 2018 – Source Newsroom: Les Mills

New research has for the first time set a recommended upper limit of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) at 30-40 minutes working out at above 90 percent of the maximum heart rate per week.

At first, I misread this and assumed they were talking about 30-40 minutes in one day, but I’m shocked to see this amount as the maximum for a whole week.   Continue reading

How Exercise Changes Gene Activity

How Exercise Changes Fat and Muscle Cells – NYTimes.com – By Gretchen Reynolds – July 31, 2013

Exercise seems able to drastically alter how genes operate.

One powerful means of affecting gene activity involves a process called methylation, in which methyl groups, a cluster of carbon and hydrogen atoms, attach to the outside of a gene and make it easier or harder for that gene to receive and respond to messages from the body.

Exercise promotes health, reducing most people’s risks of developing diabetes and growing obese. But just how, at a cellular level, exercise performs this beneficial magic — what physiological steps are involved and in what order — remains mysterious to a surprising degree.   Continue reading

Sedentary Lifestyle Increases Risk of Dying from Cancer

Sedentary Lifestyle Drastically Increases Risk of Dying from Cancer – Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center – Apr 2018

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have once again identified a link between physical inactivity and an increased risk of mortality among cancer patients, emphasizing the health risks of a sedentary lifestyle and the importance of regular exercise as therapy for cancer patients both during and after treatment.

From what I’ve been reading, this “exercise” they refer to is actually more like “activity”, as long as it’s not done sitting. That means everyday activities, like shopping, carrying, and putting away groceries, or handling small children, or walking the dog qualify as “exercise”.

Any activity that isn’t done sitting is a big improvement over sitting, even like cooking or folding laundry.   Continue reading