Tag Archives: exercise

Why Does Exercise Start Hurting Days After a Workout?

Why Does Exercise Start Hurting Two Days After a Workout? – Jan 2018 – by Daniel Kolitz

If you’ve decided, this year, to start working out, you might have noticed a strange phenomenon: You’ll leave the gym feeling fine, and then two days later wake up sore.

This weird time-lag appears unique to exercise, and is, when you think about it, kind of inexplicable—like stubbing your toe, feeling nothing, and then two days later suddenly yelping in pain.  Continue reading

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To treat back pain, look to the brain not the spine

To treat back pain, look to the brain not the spine | Aeon Essays – September 2017 by Cathryn Jakobson Ramin

For patient after patient seeking to cure chronic back pain, the experience is years of frustration. Whether they strive to treat their aching muscles, bones and ligaments through physical therapy, massage or rounds of surgery, relief is often elusive – if the pain has not been made even worse.

Now a new working hypothesis explains why: persistent back pain with no obvious mechanical source does not always result from tissue damage.

Instead, that pain is generated by the central nervous system (CNS) and lives within the brain itself.   Continue reading

Can You Burn Calories While Sitting at a Desk?

Can You Burn Calories While Sitting at a Desk? – newswise.com

A new study suggests that continuous movement while sitting may increase metabolic rate more than standing at a desk.

Craig Horswill, clinical associate professor of kinesiology and nutrition at the University of Illinois at Chicago, says the study adds to the growing body of evidence that suggests strategies for increasing non-exercise active thermogenesis (NEAT)— defined as spontaneous activity unrelated to a fitness routine — are needed to help overcome the detrimental effects of prolonged sitting.   Continue reading

Yoga Ruined My Life

It’s Nothing Personal, Yoga, But You Ruined My Life: Raising Awareness of EDS

Perhaps it’s too harsh to say yoga ruined my life, but it has given me chronic pain and joint issues that forced me to completely change my daily routine.

All you yogis out there might be wondering- how is that possible?

Well, unbeknownst to me, yoga is the last thing a person with my condition should do. Continue reading

Upper crossed syndrome: Causes, symptoms, exercises

Upper crossed syndrome: Causes, symptoms, and exercises – August 2017

People with hypermobility (EDS) tend to develop this muscular imbalance, but it’s one of the few structural problems we can fix – with exercise.

Upper crossed syndrome refers to a particular configuration of overlapping overactive and underactive muscle groups in the neck, chest, and shoulders.

Typically, poor posture causes the syndrome, including the forward head posture, which occurs when people use electronic devices, read, and drive. Those with upper crossed syndrome usually have the same or similar set of postural irregularities that people may describe as slouching.   Continue reading

Forget Pills and Surgery for Back Pain

Forget Pills and Surgery for Back Pain – Scientific American – By Daisy Yuhas – Oct 2017

Although sudden pain in the lower back can be excruciating, it often feels more irrevocable than it truly is. Some 80 percent of people experience such distress at some point in their lifetime; the vast majority of cases pass without requiring any medical attention.

I was lucky—my travail resolved within 24 hours, and aside from a missed class, the incident had no notable repercussions.  

That scenario is fairly typical: most cases of lower back pain subside on their own within 12 weeks. For some sufferers, however, the pain becomes chronic, seriously disrupting home and work life.   Continue reading

Autoimmunity Causes Exertion Problems in CFS, FMS, POTS

Exercise Tests Suggest Autoimmunity Causes the Exertion Problems in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and POTS – Health Rising – by Cort Johnson | Aug 16, 2017

Researchers and doctors get interested in ME/CFS in different ways. Many have a personal connection, but for David Systrom,  a pulmonologist, it was all about demand.

He didn’t seek chronic fatigue syndrome patients out – quite the contrary.  When Systrom was given control of a clinical cardiopulmonary lab, he started doing invasive cardiopulmonary exercise tests (iCPET’s) on people with exercise intolerance. 

Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (iCPET)   Continue reading

Forced Exercise with CBT Fails for CSF

Forced Exercise With CBT Fails for CFS  – Journal of Health Psychology –  August 29, 2017 – free full-text Research Article

The results of this study showed what patients have known all along:

For sufferers of CFS/ME,
exercise is the problem, not the solution,
it’s in the body, not the mind.

Cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise theapy are promoted as evidence-based treatments for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

This article explores patients’ symptom responses following these treatments versus pacing therapy, an approach favoured by many sufferers.  Continue reading

Should exercises be painful for chronic pain mgmt?

Should exercises be painful in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain? A systematic review and meta-analysis | British Journal of Sports Medicine – June 2017

Background: Chronic musculoskeletal disorders are a prevalent and costly global health issue. A new form of exercise therapy focused on loading and resistance programmes that temporarily aggravates a patient’s pain has been proposed.

The object of this review was to compare the effect of exercises where pain is allowed/encouraged compared with non-painful exercises on pain, function or disability in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain within randomised controlled trials. [385 participants met the inclusion criteria]

Results: There was short- term significant difference in pain, with moderate quality evidence for a small effect size of −0.27 (−0.54 to −0.05) in favour of painful exercises.   Continue reading

MSM, Strenuous Exercise, Cytokine Release

The Influence of Methylsulfonylmethane on Inflammation-Associated Cytokine Release before and following Strenuous Exercise – Oct 2016 – free full-text PMC5097813

Inflammation is associated with strenuous exercise and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties.

Methods. A total of 40 men began the study and completed testing.

Subjects were healthy, physically active, and nonsmokers and did not have any cardiovascular or metabolic disorders.

Physically active men were supplemented with either placebo or MSM (3 grams per day) for 28 days before performing 100 repetitions of eccentric knee extension exercise.   Continue reading