Tag Archives: good-news

10 Things My Chronic Illness Taught My Children

10 Things My Chronic Illness Taught My Children – The New York Times – Paula M. Fitzgibbons – DISABILITY AUG. 16, 2017

My children have a mother with a chronic illness. They live with my rheumatoid arthritis just as much as I do.

I was given my diagnosis when all three of them were young, and since then I’ve spent a lot of time worrying about what the daily uncertainty of my condition would mean to them, and whether it would affect their development.

They are all teenagers now, one getting ready for college, and I can attest that my illness has indeed affected them. Here’s how.  Continue reading

FDA Declares CBD ‘Beneficial,’ Wants Your Input ASAP

FDA Declares CBD ‘Beneficial,’ Wants Your Input ASAP – by Bruce Barcott –  August 14, 2017

The United Nations is trying to figure out how to categorize cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive and medically beneficial cannabinoid contained in cannabis. And UN officials, through the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are asking for your help.

The FDA declared that
‘CBD has been shown to be beneficial
.’
Now the agency needs your comments to back it up.

All those who have information on, or experience with, the use of CBD as a healing substance are encouraged to comment at this federal website Continue reading

Why Ketamine Helps Depression

Study Answers Why Ketamine Helps Depression, Offers Target for Safer Therapy – June 21, 2017

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine’s rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.

Ketamine is drawing intense interest in the psychiatric field after multiple studies have demonstrated it can quickly stabilize severely depressed patients.

But ketamine – sometimes illicitly used for its psychedelic properties – could also impede memory and other brain functions, spurring scientists to identify new drugs that would safely replicate its antidepressant response without the unwanted side effects.   Continue reading

8 Facts about Expired Medications

8 Facts about Expired Medications – April, 2017

Yes, it’s fine to take medications long after their expiration date, especially if they’ve been stored properly. That date is only for legal liability purposes.

Many medications are very expensive and people hate to waste them. To avoid a costly visit to the doctor for a new prescription, many people have to consume expired drugs.

Physicians and pharmaceutical companies, because of legal restrictions and liability concerns, will not sanction such use and may not even comment on the safety or effectiveness of using their products beyond the date on the label.   Continue reading

Opioids Effective in Chronic Noncancer Pain

Opioids in chronic noncancer pain: More faces from the crowd Pain Res Manag | Jul-Aug 2012C Peter N Watson, MD FRCPC | free full-text PMC3411376

The present article contains 17 case reports of 11 CNCP conditions (followed to 2011) selected to illustrate specific issues from a survey of 84 patients with intractable CNCP treated with opioids and followed every three months for a median of 11 years.

Most patients in the total sample reported 50% or greater relief and a moderate improvement in disability.

Problematic use, tolerance and serious adverse effects, including constipation, were not major issues.   Continue reading

Better State Guidelines for Use of Opioid Analgesics

Guidelines for the Chronic Use of Opioid Analgesics from State Medical Boards Opioid Guidelines As Adopted April 2017_FINAL.pdf

Adopted as policy by the Federation of State Medical Boards April 2017

INTRODUCTION

In April 2015, the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) Chair, J. Daniel Gifford, MD, FACP, appointed the Workgroup on FSMB’s Model Policy for the Use of Opioid Analgesics in the Treatment of Chronic Pain to review the current science for treating chronic pain with opioid analgesics and to revise the Model Policy as appropriate.

In updating its existing policy, the FSMB sought input from a diverse group of medical and policy stakeholders that ranged from experts in pain medicine and addiction to government officials and other thought leaders. 

This what the CDC should have done as well, but did not.  Continue reading

Call lawyers Morgan & Morgan and tell your story

» call MORGAN & MORGAN ..tell your story… refer to chronic pain patient class action PHARMACIST STEVE June 19, 2017 by Steve Ariens

 Chronic Pain Patients – Call Now
Morgan & Morgan Lawyers
888-670-2630

Ask for the medical malpractice department.
Refer to chronic pain patient class action and tell your story. 
Continue reading

Let’s not kill pain patients to “save” patients with addiction

Let’s not kill pain patients to “save” patients with addiction.
– @StefanKertesz on Twitter

As a physician, I urge caution as we cut back opioids | TheHill | By Dr. Stefan G Kertesz – Mar 28, 2017

“If all we talk about is a pill, for or against,
we are having the wrong conversation
.
We don’t take care of prescription pads.
We take care of people.” 
Continue reading

Opioids and bone density

The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism – Ther Clin Risk Manag –  2015 Mar  – free full-text PMC article

The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users.

There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids:

1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness;
2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and
3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism

The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine).  Continue reading

Medicare Sets NO Maximum Opioid Dose

CMS finalizes 2018 payment and policy updates for Medicare Health and Drug Plans, and releases a Request for Information – 2017-04-03

The final policies are similar to those proposed and discussed in the Advance Notice and draft Call Letter in February but incorporate several changes in response to feedback received during the public comment period.

CMS apparently read our comments and reacted to them, unlike the CDC, which completely ignored input on their opioid prescribing guidelines.

This is the first national policy to give authority back to physicians to manage opioid medications for chronic pain patients. It could be a sign that the medical industry is finally reconsidering its rash generic restrictions on what should be a treatment plan developed by doctors with their patients.  Continue reading