Tag Archives: media

Overdoses usually involve multiple drugs

Opioid crisis? It’s more complex than that: Study shows fatalities usually involve multiple drugs – The Boston Globeby Felice J. Freyer Globe Staff – June 2019

More of the media is starting to change their “heroin pills” stories to more realistic coverage of the overdose crisis.

It may be time to stop talking about the “opioid crisis.” Not because the crisis is over — some five people a day continue to die of overdoses in Massachusetts. But a new analysis reveals that opioids are far from the only problem:

The vast majority of people who died of opioid-related overdoses in the state had taken other drugs along with heroin and fentanyl, including stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamine. Only 17 percent had taken opioids and nothing else.    Continue reading

Opioid Overreaction

Opioid OverreactionNYTimes.com – By David Leonhardt –  Mar 2019

I’m encouraged to see this very reasonable article in the New York Times, which has previously published some anti-opioid pieces of questionable accuracy. 

Some Americans suffering from chronic pain have recently lost access to medicines that helped them live normal lives.

Other patients have had to turn to invasive and dangerous treatments, like spinal injections. Continue reading

Blaming Rx Pills For Opioid Epidemic Is Fake News

Blaming Prescription Pain Pills For The Opioid Epidemic Is Fake News
How negligent media have helped inflate a deadly moral panic over prescription opioids and ignored the real sources of addiction while hurting people who live with devastating chronic pain.By Peter Pischke – March 26, 2019

Although opioid-related deaths are driven mainly by heroin and black-market fentanyl, you would not know that from most of the press coverage, which emphasizes pain medication prescribed to patients who become addicted, overdose, and die.

This narrative is “fake news.”

This is the fairytale the media has been pushing for years and years. Just by its incessant repetition, it has ingrained itself in our culture and remains stubbornly immune to facts.  Continue reading

The Other Opiate Problem

The Other Opiate Problem By Ted Noel, MD – March 2019

Dr. Noel shows us again that overprescribing isn’t the problem – it’s an “overdose crisis” from street drugs, often contaminated with deadly illicit fentanyl.

On February 24, 60 Minutes did a segment …  calling out drug companies for “corrupt,” “immoral,” and “depraved” actions in marketing opioids.

David Kessler, former Commissioner of the FDA said, “There are no studies on the safety or efficacy of opioids for long-term use.”

Case closed! We need to restrict opioids to two or three days at most. Anything longer than that is bad medicine and gets people killed. But…     Continue reading

60 Minutes Fails to Represent Pain Patient Perspective

60 Minutes Fails to Represent Pain Patient Perspective By Laura Mills, Kate M. Nicholson, and Lindsay Baran – Mar 2019

CBS heaved out another stigmatizing and inaccurate media “story” (didn’t qualify to be called a “report”) about opioids and those who must take them. Here is the response, which points out the “pain” side of opioids (instead of just the “addiction” side).

In a Feb. 24 segment, CBS’s 60 Minutes accused the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of igniting the overdose epidemic in the United States with its “illegal approval of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain.”

While the program highlighted the adverse consequences of misleading pharmaceutical marketing and lax government oversight, this segment failed to consider the perspective of patients who legitimately use opioids for pain, stigmatized them as drug-seekers, and propagated misconceptions about the overdose crisis, such as the idea that opioid treatment for chronic pain is indisputably illegitimate and is driving overdose deaths in the US.   Continue reading

Assumptions: Often Wrong, Never in Doubt

Often Wrong, Never in Doubt – Six Ways Assumptions Mislead Us – By Chuck Dinerstein — December 19, 2018

Facts are far harder to obtain than assumptions; they may require long periods of observations or expensive, sensitive measurement devices.

Assumptions can be made more easily, in the comfort of the office, frequently papering over or shaping missing data.

One of the unintended results of this approach is that given a limited set of facts, the strength of our conclusions is based upon our certainty in the strength of our assumptions.

Assumptions are just not as sexy as conclusions and are frequently overlooked in our haste to know or do – it is a variation of often wrong, never in doubt.   Continue reading

Can You Really Be Addicted After Just One Dose?

Can You Really Become Addicted to a Drug After Just One Hit? – VICE – by Matilda Whitworth |Oct 22 2015

The idea that one toke on a crack pipe destroys your life is popular, but it contradicts what we know about brain chemistry.

You know the story. The one that says some drugs are so enjoyable, so insidious, that just one try will get you hooked. And you’d be forgiven for believing this as the media really backs the theory.

  • “The Danger In Just One Hit of Cocaine,” reports the Daily Mail.
  • Official: 1-Hit Addiction to Meth No Myth,” announces the Times Daily.
  • “It Only Took One Hit to Get Hooked,” writes news.com.

But is it actually true? Can a person become addicted to a drug after using it a single time? Continue reading

Call for Retraction of Brookings Opioid “Research Roundup”

It looks like I’m not the only one upset by the severely biased report from the Brookings Institute:

Public Health Experts Call for Retraction of Brookings Institution Opioid “Research Roundup” – By Sarah Beller – Dec 2018

An article published December 7 by the Brookings Institution, a prominent Washington, DC think tank, is under fire for promoting the idea that harm reduction approaches—like syringe exchange and naloxone—may encourage “riskier opioid use” and increase rates of opioid-related deaths.

The focus of the criticism is the choice of which articles to cite—and which not to cite—by the authors of the Institution’s “research roundup.”   Continue reading

The Other Side of Opioids – YouTube

The Other Side of Opioids – YouTube

Here is a mainstream media outlet that’s bucking the opioid BS trend and reporting the truth about our desperate situation – which has nothing to do with the rising rates of overdose deaths from opioids or anything else people can get their hands on.

LAS VEGAS – Nightly newscasts across the country are filled with stories about the opioid epidemic — the opioid crisis. Tens of thousands of Americans who die each year are found with opioids in …

This 45 minute video is a year old and has received 175,000 downloads. It is still current and very pertinent, as the HHS Task Force on Best Practices in Pain Management draws together its recommendations to Congress.

It’s wonderful to see that our story is reaching so many people. I just hope they’re not all other pain patients, but perhaps people that might never have seen this other “painful” side of the supposed “opioid crisis”. Continue reading

It’s a (illicit) Fentanyl Crisis, Stupid!

It’s a Fentanyl Crisis, Stupid! – Kaatje Gotcha Crippled Comedy – Medium – by Kaatje Gotcha | Crippled Comedy – Dec 2018

This excellent article from an author crippled by spinal pain tells the story of the current “pain crisis”.

She explains how the CDC guidelines were written in secrecy with input mainly from anti-opioid activists and how these guidelines have had horrible effects on pain care in this country. She backs up her statements with numerous current references, as everyone should (and the anti-opioid zealots never do).

In 2012, life was great: I proudly wore a white coat with a stethoscope around my neck and finally felt useful to humanity. 

Because the author was/is a medical professional, she knows what she’s talking about. Continue reading