Tag Archives: media

60 Minutes Fails to Represent Pain Patient Perspective

60 Minutes Fails to Represent Pain Patient Perspective By Laura Mills, Kate M. Nicholson, and Lindsay Baran – Mar 2019

CBS heaved out another stigmatizing and inaccurate media “story” (didn’t qualify to be called a “report”) about opioids and those who must take them. Here is the response, which points out the “pain” side of opioids (instead of just the “addiction” side).

In a Feb. 24 segment, CBS’s 60 Minutes accused the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of igniting the overdose epidemic in the United States with its “illegal approval of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain.”

While the program highlighted the adverse consequences of misleading pharmaceutical marketing and lax government oversight, this segment failed to consider the perspective of patients who legitimately use opioids for pain, stigmatized them as drug-seekers, and propagated misconceptions about the overdose crisis, such as the idea that opioid treatment for chronic pain is indisputably illegitimate and is driving overdose deaths in the US.   Continue reading

Assumptions: Often Wrong, Never in Doubt

Often Wrong, Never in Doubt – Six Ways Assumptions Mislead Us – By Chuck Dinerstein — December 19, 2018

Facts are far harder to obtain than assumptions; they may require long periods of observations or expensive, sensitive measurement devices.

Assumptions can be made more easily, in the comfort of the office, frequently papering over or shaping missing data.

One of the unintended results of this approach is that given a limited set of facts, the strength of our conclusions is based upon our certainty in the strength of our assumptions.

Assumptions are just not as sexy as conclusions and are frequently overlooked in our haste to know or do – it is a variation of often wrong, never in doubt.   Continue reading

Can You Really Be Addicted After Just One Dose?

Can You Really Become Addicted to a Drug After Just One Hit? – VICE – by Matilda Whitworth |Oct 22 2015

The idea that one toke on a crack pipe destroys your life is popular, but it contradicts what we know about brain chemistry.

You know the story. The one that says some drugs are so enjoyable, so insidious, that just one try will get you hooked. And you’d be forgiven for believing this as the media really backs the theory.

  • “The Danger In Just One Hit of Cocaine,” reports the Daily Mail.
  • Official: 1-Hit Addiction to Meth No Myth,” announces the Times Daily.
  • “It Only Took One Hit to Get Hooked,” writes news.com.

But is it actually true? Can a person become addicted to a drug after using it a single time? Continue reading

Call for Retraction of Brookings Opioid “Research Roundup”

It looks like I’m not the only one upset by the severely biased report from the Brookings Institute:

Public Health Experts Call for Retraction of Brookings Institution Opioid “Research Roundup” – By Sarah Beller – Dec 2018

An article published December 7 by the Brookings Institution, a prominent Washington, DC think tank, is under fire for promoting the idea that harm reduction approaches—like syringe exchange and naloxone—may encourage “riskier opioid use” and increase rates of opioid-related deaths.

The focus of the criticism is the choice of which articles to cite—and which not to cite—by the authors of the Institution’s “research roundup.”   Continue reading

The Other Side of Opioids – YouTube

The Other Side of Opioids – YouTube

Here is a mainstream media outlet that’s bucking the opioid BS trend and reporting the truth about our desperate situation – which has nothing to do with the rising rates of overdose deaths from opioids or anything else people can get their hands on.

LAS VEGAS – Nightly newscasts across the country are filled with stories about the opioid epidemic — the opioid crisis. Tens of thousands of Americans who die each year are found with opioids in …

This 45 minute video is a year old and has received 175,000 downloads. It is still current and very pertinent, as the HHS Task Force on Best Practices in Pain Management draws together its recommendations to Congress.

It’s wonderful to see that our story is reaching so many people. I just hope they’re not all other pain patients, but perhaps people that might never have seen this other “painful” side of the supposed “opioid crisis”. Continue reading

It’s a (illicit) Fentanyl Crisis, Stupid!

It’s a Fentanyl Crisis, Stupid! – Kaatje Gotcha Crippled Comedy – Medium – by Kaatje Gotcha | Crippled Comedy – Dec 2018

This excellent article from an author crippled by spinal pain tells the story of the current “pain crisis”.

She explains how the CDC guidelines were written in secrecy with input mainly from anti-opioid activists and how these guidelines have had horrible effects on pain care in this country. She backs up her statements with numerous current references, as everyone should (and the anti-opioid zealots never do).

In 2012, life was great: I proudly wore a white coat with a stethoscope around my neck and finally felt useful to humanity. 

Because the author was/is a medical professional, she knows what she’s talking about. Continue reading

Meta-Analysis of Opioids for Chronic Noncancer Pain

This JAMA study showed what pain patients have always known, that the “use of opioids compared with placebo was associated with significantly less pain” and “significantly improved physical functioning”.

However, because the “magnitude of the association was small”, the anti-opioid zealots inspired a media circus trumpeting that pain relief from opioids was negligible. (Let’s see how they feel after they wake up from surgery without opioids.)

Below is the abstract of the study itself and then a clear and reasonable analysis of the results by Pat Anston, editor of Pain News Network.   Continue reading

Doctors struggling with crackdown on prescriptions

Fox Part II I Doctors caught between struggling opioid patients and crackdown on prescriptions – By Elizabeth Llorente | Fox News

This is the second of a three-part series on the nation’s struggle to address its crippling opioid crisis, and the unintended victims left in its wake. Read Part 1 here: As doctors taper or end opioid prescriptions, many patients driven to despair, suicide.

Dr. Stephen Nadeau received a warning from the Gainesville, Fla., hospital where he worked. Their policy on prescribing opioids was changing, to go beyond federal guidelines aimed at the national overdose crisis that has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.

The hospital would stop treating pain with opioids.  

That’s like a hospital deciding it would stop treating infections with antibiotics! Sure, not all people need them, but in some situations, it’s by far the best choice.    Continue reading

Opioid Drugmakers Call for Specificity in Cases of Harm

Opioid Drugmakers Call for Specificity in Cases of Harm in Government Lawsuits Filed Against Them – Oct 19, 2018 By Alex Keown

As more and more lawsuits are filed by state and local governments over the opioid epidemic, drugmakers are fighting back in court by demanding the allegations include specifics on how the companies are to blame.

As the city of New Orleans and Missouri’s Franklin County become the latest local governments to file more than 1,500 lawsuits against opioid manufacturers, companies like Purdue Pharmaceuticals, the maker of OxyContin, are asking the plaintiffs for specifics in exactly how the companies are to blame for the overdose deaths, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

This is an interesting avenue of defense that could expose how few legitimate patients overdose. We may find out how few specifics we have about this “opioid crisis” and how few specifics we about all the drug deaths that have been counted as “opioid overdoses” to arrive at the huge numbers we’re seeing. Continue reading

Media, Politicians Unaware that Addiction != Dependence

Are Media and Politicians Aware That Addiction and Dependence Are Not the Same Thing? – September 18, 2018 – Jeffrey A. Singer

Hardly a day goes by without a report in the press about some new addiction.

One gets the impression that life is awash in threats of addiction. People tend to equate the word “addiction” with “abuse.” Ironically, “addiction” is a subject of abuse.

The American Society of Addiction Medicine defines addiction as a

  • “chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry…characterized by
  • the inability to consistently abstain,
  • impairment in behavioral control,
  • craving” that continues despite resulting destruction of relationships, economic conditions, and health

Continue reading