Tag Archives: outrage

More Veteran Suicides Than Combat Deaths

Time to Bring the Troops Home: More Veterans Committed Suicide Last Decade Than Died in Vietnamby Matt Agorist – Mar 2020

I knew there was a high rate of suicide among veterans since pain medications have been restricted, but I had no idea that those on active duty are also dying from suicide (though I’m not terribly surprised).

It is no secret that the leading cause of death among active duty troops deployed to the Middle East is not combat or accidents, or IEDs — it’s themselves.

The Pentagon’s own statistics show that this is a crisis but it is being ignored.  

This crisis is also happening in the civilian population. No one is making the logical connection between forcing so many Americans to give up effective pain relief and the increasing numbers of suicides.  Continue reading

‘Opioid Epidemic’? Misperceptions Versus Facts

Misperceptions about the ‘Opioid Epidemic:’ Exploring the Facts July 2019Pain Management Nursing

Thank goodness for nurses! In this lengthy document, they meticulously prove that the ‘Opioid Epidemic’ is a complete fabrication, hyped by anti-opioid activists and spread into our society and even our medical system despite reams of evidence to the contrary from science and government data.

This thoroughly referenced article itemizes and thoroughly debunks the anti-opioid misperceptions (if not outright lies) that have swept through the medical profession and corrupted clear, logical thinking about the rising rate of illicit drug overdoses (not from prescribed opioids).

This is the most sensible document I’ve ever read about the so-called “opioid crisis”. Supported by numerous scientific references, it makes all the arguments we pain patient advocates have been making for years.  Continue reading

Nurses Defend Doctor Charged in Hospital Deaths

Nurses Defend Ohio Doctor Charged in Deaths at Hospital – The New York Times – Dec. 20, 2019

After I’d annotated this article back in December, I went back to look at it and got the error” Page No Longer Available” from the NY Times. This has never happened before, so I’m left to wonder why this particular article would be disappeared.

I suspect it’s because it points out that the “leaders” of healthcare industries are utterly ignorant about opioid doses, while the people spending time with the real patients, like doctors and nurses, are doing their best to ease the pain and suffering of their most sick and dying patients.

Ten former colleagues of an Ohio hospital doctor who pleaded not guilty to murder in 25 patients’ deaths are coming to his defense in a new lawsuit.   Continue reading

Opioid Distributer Concealed Diverted Shipments

McKesson hid security flaws that fueled opioid epidemic, the lawsuit alleges – by ALEX KACIK  – Dec 2019

McKesson Corp. allegedly concealed security flaws in its supply chain, which fueled the opioid epidemic, according to a recently unsealed whistleblower case.

Former employees at the wholesale drug distribution giant claim that McKesson would hide the extent of its security issues from the federal government and falsely represented that it would comply with two settlement agreements. Millions of the addictive pain pills were diverted to the black market as a result, according to the lawsuit.

This is the source of all the opioid medications that flooded the black market. (I’ve been pointing this out for years.)   Continue reading

Non-opioid Overdose Death Rates Rising

Nonopioid Overdose Death Rates Rose Almost As Fast As Those Involving Opioids, 1999-2016. – PubMed – NCBI  – Jul 2019

Even 6 months ago, it was becoming clear that overdoses aren’t “caused by opioids”, but rather all kinds of drugs, of which illicit opioids like fentanyl undoubtedly play a huge part.

But they are still trying to link all the overdoses to opioids using the most inside-out reasoning (if it can even be called that) that’s clearly influenced by PROPaganda.

The number of Americans dying from drug overdoses has risen rapidly, but the contribution of nonopioid drugs to this growth is not well understood.

And it won’t be understood until they clear their heads of the nonsense they’ve been flooded with. Continue reading

Opioids Prescriptions Rare before OUD or Overdose

Trends in prescription opioid use and dose trajectories before opioid use disorder or overdose in US adults from 2006 to 2016: A cross-sectional studyNov 2019

I’m not going to pretend to be impartial and scientific anymore – this obscene charade of drug-warriors fighting what they call an “opioid epidemic” has gone to such ridiculous extremes (no opioids after cutting open a woman’s abdomen to pull her baby out) that I can no longer restrain my outrage.

With governments’ increasing efforts to curb opioid prescription use and limit dose below the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-recommended threshold of 90 morphine milligram equivalents per day, little is known about prescription opioid patterns preceding opioid use disorder (OUD) or overdose.

Limiting opioid prescriptions never worked in the past, isn’t working now, and never will work. It cannot work because legitimate opioid prescriptions are not related to opioid overdoses. How long will it take these bureaucrats to figure this out?  Continue reading

AI used to increase medical billing

AI-based product aims to help providers identify missed charges | Health Data Management – By Joseph Goedert – Sep 2019

It’s always interesting to look at a subject from a different point of view because it gives a more complete picture. I found this article in a publication called “Health Data Management”, which is focused on the health data and computing aspect of healthcare and has nothing to do with medical care.

This article predictably uses the generic functional term “provider” for doctors and nurses, a standardized and interchangeable version of the real people actually practicing medicine.

This is a hint of what we can expect in the future of healthcare after AI systems are embedded in every facet of our care: standardized “providers” will follow standard algorithms to diagnose and treat “standard” patients, who are all assumed to be the mythical “average human”. Continue reading

How Did We Come to Abandon America’s Pain Patients?

How Did We Come to Abandon America’s Pain Patients? – Filter Magazine – Alison Knopf – July 2019

Overdoses—not those involving prescription opioids, but of heroin and illicit fentanyl, often combined with benzodiazepinescontinue to go up. But

And many physicians, caught in the middle, have stopped prescribing because they don’t want to get in trouble and possibly lose their livelihood.   Continue reading

Diagnosis Codes Index – Opioid related disorders

Diagnosis Codes Index – Opioid related disorders (F11)

In the new ICD-10 system for medical billing codes, there’s a specific code for anything and everything to do with opioids. There’s even a code for “opioid use, unspecified, uncomplicated, which seems to indicate that any “use” of opioids is a medical problem in itself. 

We can see how “the medical system” is organized by looking at how healthcare services are billed. Looking at the hierarchy of categories in this billing scheme, we can discover how they see us, pain patients, using opioids.

The problems start at the top level: our “code” is listed under the category of “Mental disorders”:

Mental and behavioural disorders (F00–F99)    Continue reading

Opioids allocated based on business decision

‘Business decision’: Former DEA official works for opioid lawyers but set standards for how many pills were madeBy John O’Brien | Sep 3, 2019

The DEA knew more about what quantities of opioids went where than anyone else, so I’m baffled why they didn’t stop the excessive orders that everyone is complaining about now.

Asked what would’ve happened if a pharmaceutical distributor wanted advice on whether a large order of opioids was suspicious, the man in charge of federal regulation of those pills for 10 years said he wouldn’t have helped.

Instead, Joe Rannazzisi, who set always-increasing opioid quotas for theindustry while he headed a Drug Enforcement Agency department from 2005-15, said the company would be left on its own to figure it out.    Continue reading