Tag Archives: overdose

NON-opioid Overdose Death Rates Rising

Nonopioid Overdose Death Rates Rose Almost As Fast As Those Involving Opioids, 1999-2016. – PubMed – NCBI – Jul 2019

I’m sure we’ll be hearing more and more about overdose deaths from illicit fentanyl and multi-drug combinations. In one narrow aspect, the DEA has succeeded: prescription opioids are extremely difficult to get hold of these days, even if you have a medically legitimate need.

So whoever needs the effective relief opioids provide from intractable (incurable, lifelong) pain, has to procure them on the black market, where they often end up with counterfeit versions.

The number of Americans dying from drug overdoses has risen rapidly, but the contribution of nonopioid drugs to this growth is not well understood.    Continue reading

Contribution of Rx Versus Illicit Opioids to Overdoses

The Contribution of Prescribed and Illicit Opioids to Fatal Overdoses in Massachusetts, 2013-2015 – Oct 2019

Massachusetts is only an example of what we’d find in other states if they were more concerned with finding out what’s killing people who overdose. Instead, it’s often not tested adequately to find the real culprit because it’s already assumed that any sign of any opioid makes it a “prescription opioid overdose” to be added to those inflated numbers.

Objectives:
Opioid-related overdoses are commonly attributed to prescription opioids.

Whether true or not, our “public service” coroners just follow the path of least resistance and fall into the false confidence of their predetermined ideas.  Continue reading

Mortality After Discontinuation of Opioid Therapy for Pain

Mortality After Discontinuation of Primary Care-Based Chronic Opioid Therapy for Pain: a Retrospective Cohort Study. – PubMed – NCBI – J Gen Intern Med. – Aug 2019

BACKGROUND:

Despite known risks of using chronic opioid therapy (COT) for pain, the risks of discontinuation of COT are largely uncharacterized.

These “risks of discontinuation of COT” are not “largely uncharacterized” but rather completely unstudied.

Pain patients being tapered are being used as guinea pigs because those who are restricting opioids have no idea what the results might be.  Continue reading

Real Overdose Data from NIDA

Here is a whole page of some excellent charts from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA). – July 2019

NIDA has the most accurate, up to date, and pertinent information, since it’s the federal agency whose mission it is to deal with drug abuse, not the CDC or FDA.

Below is the chart showing that it’s illicit Fentanyl that’s increasingly involved. Note that in the numbers for prescriptions, the opioids are almost always not prescribed to the person overdosing.

A mystery: how small doses of heroin can kill

Solving the heroin overdose mystery: how small doses can kill – Shepard Siegel | Aeon Ideas Shepard Siegel June 2017

Heroin, like other opiates, depresses activity in the brain centre that controls breathing. Sometimes, this effect is so profound that the drug user dies, and becomes yet another overdose casualty.

Some of these victims die because they took too much of the drug.

Others die following self-administration of a dose that appears much too small to be lethal, but why? This is the heroin overdose mystery, and it has been known for more than half a century.   Continue reading

Alcohol and Opioid Use, Co-Use, and Chronic Pain

Alcohol and Opioid Use, Co-Use, and Chronic Pain in the Context of the Opioid Epidemic: A Critical Review – free full-text /PMC5832605/

The dramatic increase in opioid misuse, opioid use disorder (OUD), and opioid-related overdose deaths in the United States has led to public outcry, policy statements, and funding initiatives.

Indeed, the tidal wave of funding for studies looking for problems that can be correlated with opioid use is astonishing, especially considering they all focus intently on milligrams of opioids and not much else.

Meanwhile, alcohol misuse and alcohol use disorder is a highly prevalent public health problem associated with considerable individual and societal costs. This paper provides a critical review of alcohol and opioid misuse, including issues of prevalence, morbidity, and societal costs.   Continue reading

Which Misused Rx Meds Send Americans to the ER?

Which Misused Prescription Meds Send Americans to the ER?  – By Dennis Thompson – Mar 2019

Most folks treated in a U.S. emergency room for misuse of prescription medications get into trouble because they mix different substances, a new study reports.

Benzodiazepines like Xanax (alprazolam) and Ativan (lorazepam) are most commonly implicated in health crises that lead to an ER visit, followed by prescription opioids, researchers found.

But in most cases, the patients fell ill because these drugs were taken with other substances and created a dangerous interaction, said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Geller.

We’ve known from the start that overdoses weren’t caused by patients taking their prescribed medicine as directed and nothing else.  Continue reading

Impact of High-Dose Opioid Analgesics on Overdose

Cohort Study of the Impact of High-Dose Opioid Analgesics on Overdose Mortality | Pain Medicine | Oxford Academic – free full-text – Jan 2016

This study from 3 years ago shows that the CDC’s 90mg “threshold” is merely one of convenience and does not exist in “real life”.

Objective.

Previous studies examining opioid dose and overdose risk provide limited granularity by milligram strength and instead rely on thresholds.

We quantify dose-dependent overdose mortality over a large spectrum of clinically common doses.   Continue reading

Impact of High-Dose Opioids on Overdoses

Cohort Study of the Impact of High-Dose Opioid Analgesics on Overdose Mortality | Pain Medicine | Oxford AcademicJanuary 2016

Objective.

Previous studies examining opioid dose and overdose risk provide limited granularity by milligram strength and instead rely on thresholds.

We quantify dose-dependent overdose.

Spoiler: there is no linear or incremental increase in overdose risk by dosage.  The 90MME limit proposed by the CDC Guideline isn’t based on science, but more like a consensus “best guess” by addiction doctors.  Continue reading