Tag Archives: patients

Strange Correlations with Opiod Use

Inspire.com Opioid Information Thread – User “Seshet” – Aug 2019

This is “Seshet’s” ongoing thread that’s very similar to what I do here: finding and reporting on the latest opioid-related articles. He’s a self-described “math nerd” with a scientific background, so his analysis of these articles is based on hard facts, not sentiments or speculation.

More fascinating research from NIDA. Seems that drug initiation is seasonal.

For more such “spurious correlations” see a previous post of that very name which a list of countless correlations of completely unrelated variables: “Spurious Correlations“.

The Landscape of Chronic Pain

The Landscape of Chronic Pain: Broader Perspectives – free full-text /PMC6572619/ – by Mark I. Johnson – May 2019

Here is a recent lengthy review of what’s known about chronic pain: the various aspects of various types of pain under various circumstances.

This article shows the folly of making any numerical one-dimensional measurement of chronic pain, which can arise from a variety of causes, vary greatly over time and location, and make such intrusive incursions into our inner lives.

This special issue on matters related to chronic pain aims to draw on research and scholarly discourse from an eclectic mix of areas and perspectives.   Continue reading

Opioid Addiction AND Pain Treatment

One of us was a pain patient saved by opioids, the other was addicted to them. We both deserve a solutionLos Angeles Times – By Ryan Hampton and Kate M. Nicholson – Apr 2019

This is an excellent article in a popular mainstream publication written by two people on the opposite ends of the “opioid crisis”. They point out that a common solution is needed, not one at the expense of the other, as has been done in the past.

Opioids have figured prominently in both our lives.

  • For Kate, they were a lifeline after a surgical mishap left her unable to sit, stand or walk for more than a decade.
  • For Ryan, they were a gateway to a dark decade of heroin addiction.

many Americans believe that we have over-treated pain at the expense of those who became addicted to prescription opioids.   Continue reading

Ethics of Using Facial Recognition Tech in Healthcare

What Are Important Ethical Implications of Using Facial Recognition Technology in Health Care?AMA Journal of Ethics – Nicole Martinez-Martin, JD, PhD

Abstract:

Applications of facial recognition technology (FRT) in health care settings have been developed to identify and monitor patients as well as to diagnose genetic, medical, and behavioral conditions.

The use of FRT in health care suggests the importance of informed consent, data input and analysis quality, effective communication about incidental findings, and potential influence on patient-clinician relationships.

Privacy and data protection are thought to present challenges for the use of FRT for health applications.  Continue reading

April Fools Day – A National Day of Pain

April Fools Day – A National Day of Pain – National Pain Reportby Richard A. (“Red”) Lawhern, Ph.D – Mar 2019

I wish this effort had started sooner – maybe next year.

.April Fools Day is known around the world as a day for practical and sometimes impractical jokes.

This year, chronic pain patients, their families and their doctors can instead choose to make April 1st a day of change and protest. It can become a National Day of Pain.

The needle on public policy for treatment of pain is beginning to quiver:   Continue reading

The forgotten victims of the opioid epidemic

Chronic pain patients are forgotten victims of opioid epidemic – By Elyse Morgan and Jacqueline A. Schwarz – Jan 2019

In this article, the authors explain how our screwed up opioid policies arise from 3 fundamental myths firmly embedded in the American mind and endlessly repeated by PROPaganda.

Our country’s well-intentioned efforts to stop opioid abuse and related overdoses have left a group of Americans fighting for their lives. Medications including opiates have allowed hundreds of thousands of patients with chronic pain to function for many years.

Recent media stories to the contrary, research reveals that fewer than 1 percent of patients became addicted following lengthy opioid treatment. Long-term treatment does not cause addiction rates that are higher than those in the total population. Continue reading

4 disturbing trends in health care

4 disturbing trends in health care – Praveen Suthrum | KevinMD | Aug 2018

I agree with the author that health care is changing dramatically and not necessarily in a good direction. This article points out some fundamental issues that must be addressed before any “progress” can be made.

It’s easy to get excited about technological advances such as nanobots that swim in blood to deliver drugs or 3-D printers that print human tissues. However, in our enthusiasm to find the next fix, we are failing to notice the ground slipping underneath the health care industry.

Here are four trends that are changing health care but on the surface are too unsexy for us to care about.   Continue reading

Patient-Centered Care for Chronic Pain

My Take on the Biopsychosocial Model of Patient-Centered Care | Pain Medicine | Oxford Academic – Jianguo Cheng, MD, PhD, FIPP – September 2018

I am privileged to participate in the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Pain Management Inter-Agency Task Force (PMTF) and in the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Action Collaborative on Countering the US Opioid Epidemic.

Promoting patient-centered care is what I believe to be the most important mission of our profession.

And patient-centered care should be the guiding principle of policy-making by federal and state agencies, health care payers, and professional organizations and societies.   Continue reading

Pain Management Choices: One Person’s Point-of-View

Pain Management Choices: One Person’s Point-of-View – By Danny van Leeuwen – Oct 2018

Pain and choices mix, but not too well. A sudden new pain requires professional attention and a pill – I gotta get over this. With severe chronic pain, I pray for some choices that I know might work.

I want choices to prevent the pain – a routine.

Please find the audio and slide deck here on my YouTube channel. It’s 44 minutes long with the Q&A portion.

Or, read on for more information in print:  Continue reading

Perspectives of primary care patients with chronic pain

Voices that may not otherwise be heard: a qualitative exploration into the perspectives of primary care patients living with chronic pain| JPR – June 2014

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of a combination of qualitative methods (Photovoice, one-on-one interviews, and focus groups) in examining the daily experiences of primary care patients living with chronic pain.

Methods: A sample of English-speaking primary care patients aged 30 years or older, who had been prescribed an opioid for long-term, noncancer pain management, participated in the study.

Each patient took photographs that best reflected both

  • his/her experiences with chronic pain and
  • what he/she would like his/her life to be without chronic pain.

Continue reading