Tag Archives: POTS

Joint Hypermobility Associated with Anxiety

Brain structure and joint hypermobility: relevance to the expression of psychiatric symptoms – Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun – free full text /PMC3365276/

This is not a new article, but a thorough scientific survey of the brain differences seen in people with hypermobility (which is usually undiagnosed EDS). This was the beginning of my understanding that EDS is not just a physical issue, but also affects our minds.

To me, it makes sense that the same instability (lack of balance, tendency to extremes) found in our bodies would also be represented in our brains/minds.

Joint hypermobility is overrepresented among people with anxiety and can be associated with abnormal autonomic reactivity.   Continue reading

Autoimmunity Causes Exertion Problems in CFS, FMS, POTS

Exercise Tests Suggest Autoimmunity Causes the Exertion Problems in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and POTS – Health Rising – by Cort Johnson | Aug 16, 2017

Researchers and doctors get interested in ME/CFS in different ways. Many have a personal connection, but for David Systrom,  a pulmonologist, it was all about demand.

He didn’t seek chronic fatigue syndrome patients out – quite the contrary.  When Systrom was given control of a clinical cardiopulmonary lab, he started doing invasive cardiopulmonary exercise tests (iCPET’s) on people with exercise intolerance. 

Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (iCPET)   Continue reading

Hypermobility Syndromes and Chronic Pain in Children

This article goes into great detail outlining the consequences of hypermobility syndromes in children, causing chronic pain, significant disability, and a reduction in quality of life.

When flexibility is not necessarily a virtue: a review of hypermobility syndromes and chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in children – 2015 Oct – free full-text PMC4596461

Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in children.

Among the most common causes for this problem are different conditions associated with hypermobility   Continue reading

EDS linked to Orthostatic Intolerance and POTS

Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?  – Biomed Res Int. – Feb 2017 – free full-text PMC article

Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by

  • generalized joint hypermobility,
  • skin texture abnormalities, and
  • visceral and vascular dysfunctions,
  • also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction.

This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.  Continue reading

Autonomic Dysfunction and Fatigue

Autonomic Dysfunction and Fatigue – Alan Pocinki MD – notes from a 2015 presentation

These are notes from a 2015 presentation given by Alan Pocinki, a well-known EDS specialist. The format is not pretty, but the information is discernable, so I’ve left it exactly as written.

Cardio Vascular Dysregulation

  • POTS- Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
  • OH- Orthostatic Hypotension
  • NMH- Neurally mediated hypotension (vaso-vagal syncope, neuro-cardiogenic syncope, delayed orthostatic hypotension)
  • OI- Orthostatic Intolerance

What We Know About Cardiovascular Dysregulation  Continue reading

Recognizing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

Recognizing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome : Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants

This article describes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis, and management of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), a potentially debilitating autonomic disorder that can have many causes and presentations.

POTS can be mistaken for panic disorder, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Clinician suspicion for the syndrome is key to prompt patient diagnosis and treatment.   Continue reading

Dysautonomia: Types and Symptoms

Dysautonomia: Types, Symptoms, and Treatments – Medical News Today

Dysautonomia is not a single disorder, the term describes a number of conditions which affect the autonomic nervous system. This section of the nervous system controls automatic body functions, like heart rate and breathing.

dysautonomia affects an estimated 70 million people worldwide.

In this article, we will describe some of the different types of dysautonomia, their symptoms, and treatments.   Continue reading

Autonomic Dysfunction and Fatigue in hEDS

Excellent information on EDS in general, from a slideshow by Alan Pocinki, MD (I can’t find the original link):

Autonomic Dysfunction and Fatigue

Cardio Vascular Dysregulation

  • POTS- Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
  • OH- Orthostatic Hypotension
  • NMH- Neurally mediated hypotension (vaso-vagal syncope, neuro-cardiogenic syncope, delayed orthostatic hypotension)
  • OI- Orthostatic Intolerance

What We Know About Cardiovascular Dysregulation   Continue reading

Tricyclic Antidepressants: The Good, the Bad, and the Potentially Ugly

Tricyclic Antidepressants in Neuropathic Pain: The Good, the Bad, and the Potentially Ugly | Pharmacy Times | Kelsie Flynn, PharmD

Antidepressant Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain

Although clinicians are able to identify the causes of neuropathic pain, the mechanism behind its treatment is more difficult to distinguish.

The drugs’ potential analgesic properties were noted long before in a study published in 1960.

Although tricyclic antidepressants remained the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for neuropathic pain for years, the drugs’ true mechanism wasn’t revealed until 1992.   Continue reading

Neurovisceral phenotypes in the expression of psychiatric symptoms

Neurovisceral phenotypes in the expression of psychiatric symptoms | Autonomic Neuroscience | Review ARTICLE |February 2015 

This review supports what I’ve long suspected: it’s not just my body that’s hypermobile, but my emotions as well. Physical instability is neurologically related to mental instability.

This review explores the proposal that vulnerability to psychological symptoms, particularly anxiety, originates in constitutional differences in the control of bodily state, exemplified by a set of conditions that include Joint Hypermobility, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope.

Research is revealing how brain-body mechanisms underlie individual differences in psychophysiological reactivity that can be important for predicting, stratifying and treating individuals with anxiety disorders and related conditions.  Continue reading