Tag Archives: quackery

Top US hospitals aggressively promoting alternative medicine

Medicine with a side of mysticism: Top hospitals promote unproven therapies – By CASEY ROSS @byCaseyRoss, MAX BLAU @maxblau, and KATE SHERIDAN @sheridan_kate – Mar 2017

I know that various unusual therapies work for some people some of the time (myself included), but they are truly a hit and miss proposition.

They’re among the nation’s premier medical centers, at the leading edge of scientific research.

Yet hospitals affiliated with Yale, Duke, Johns Hopkins, and other top medical research centers also aggressively promote alternative therapies with little or no scientific backing.

They offer “energy healing” to help treat multiple sclerosis, acupuncture for infertility, and homeopathic bee venom for fibromyalgia. A public forum hosted by the University of Florida’s hospital even promises to explain how herbal therapy can reverse Alzheimer’s. (It can’t.)  Continue reading

Top US hospitals aggressively promoting Alt-Med

Top US hospitals aggressively promoting alternative medicine offerings – Should prestigious hospitals promote unproven alternative medicine? – Stat News – Mar 2017

They’re among the nation’s premier medical centers, at the leading edge of scientific research. Yet hospitals affiliated with Yale, Duke, Johns Hopkins, and other top medical research centers also aggressively promote alternative therapies with little or no scientific backing.

They offer

  • “energy healing” to help treat multiple sclerosis,
  • acupuncture for infertility, and
  • homeopathic bee venom for fibromyalgia.
  • A public forum hosted by the University of Florida’s hospital even promises to explain how herbal therapy can reverse Alzheimer’s. (It can’t.)   Continue reading

Anti-vaccine rant from Cleveland Clinic

Anti-vaccine rant exposes conflict over hospitals’ embrace of alternative medicine –  Stat News – 1/9/17

In the span of a few days, the anti-vaccine screed of a Cleveland Clinic doctor prompted a social media firestorm, an apparent retraction from the physician, and promises of disciplinary action by administrators of his prestigious hospital system.

But those reactions will not entirely contain the damage caused by the rant, which has already been picked up by anti-vaccine organizations1, or address a more fundamental question:

Why do hospitals that espouse evidence-based medical care operate alternative medicine institutes that offer treatments with little foundation in science?

This has been my question ever since the CDC started recommending treatments like chiropractic and massage therapy instead of opioids.   Continue reading