Tag Archives: research

Fascia Research from the NIH

Because fascia is made from collagen, the genetic defect from EDS will often cause us problems with this tissue. It’s thin, fragile, stretches too much, and gives way too easily.

PubMed Central® (PMC) is a free full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM).

Research on the body’s fascia (connective tissue) is finding more and more of its functions and abilities, going far beyond just “holding stuff together”.  I’ve posted here the abstracts of the following 4 articles and you can decide for yourself if they’re worth reading in full.

  1. Smooth Muscle
  2. Visceral Fascia
  3. Bone Tissue
  4. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

Continue reading

The Tyranny of the Randomized Controlled Trial

Should we beware the tyranny of the randomized controlled trial? | Association of Health Care Journalistsby Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) – Jan 2017

The intersection of scientific research, evidence and expertise can be a dicey one, particularly in an age in which evidence-based medicine is replacing the clinical expertise of practitioners.

In The New York Times Sunday Review, Jamie Holmes wrote about how the challenge of assessing the quality of evidence against expertise and less stringently conducted research can lead readers to confusion and frustration.

It can lead to a further distrust of science, Holmes suggested, noting the example of dental flossing in the wake of an Associated Press story that questioned the evidence in favor of the practice.    Continue reading

Long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain

Long-term opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain. NIH – Feb 2015 – a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, tolerability, and safety in open-label extension trials with a study duration of at least 26 weeks (that’s 1/2 year).

This study confirms what pain patients all know: long-term opioids are effective for long-term pain, require few increases, and only rarely result in “opioid use disorder”. 

The efficacy and safety of long-term (≥ 6 months) opioid therapy (LtOT) in chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) is under debate.A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and harms of opioids in open-label extension studies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has not been conducted until now.   Continue reading

Opioids Continue to Be Effective Long Term

Opioids Continue to Be Effective Long Term Medscape – Fran Lowry – October 01, 2013

This is a good review with results that ring true in my experience,

Unfortunately, it’s fatally tainted by funding from Purdue.

An extensive literature review of studies evaluating the effectiveness of long-term opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) concludes that the drugs continue to provide reliable and safe analgesia for 6 months or more.

“Due to FDA regulatory guidelines, most contemporary phase 3 randomized controlled trials of opioid analgesics for CNCP are 3 months long or less.   Continue reading

Hypermobility, EDS, and Chronic Pain

Hypermobility, the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and chronic pain. – PubMed – Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2017 Sep-Oct;

This is yet another scientific paper adding to the evidence of how painful EDS (and other connective tissue disorders) can be.

Chronic widespread pain is a common complaint among individuals affected by generalised joint hypermobility.

In the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, these individuals are usually diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). JHS is a multifactorial trait with a strong genetic basis, but no specific genetic markers.

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NGF Inhibitor leads to rapid joint destruction

NGF Inhibitor Reduces Joint Pain but Raises Risk for Deterioration – Pain Medicine News – Oct 2019

Tanezumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody that inhibits nerve growth factor, improved joint pain and physical function in patients with osteoarthritis, in a placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Although the agent demonstrated efficacy relative to placebo in study participants who had not obtained relief with conventional agents, the investigators characterized the improvement with tanezumab as modest, and found that it was associated with an increased incidence of rapidly progressive osteoarthritis (OA) and a requirement for total joint arthroplasty.

Such adverse effects would doom any other medication, but this one keeps getting promoted only because it’s not an opioid.  Continue reading

Take our Survey about Chronic Pain 2019

Take our Survey about Chronic Pain –  U.S. Pain Foundation – Sept 2019

The U.S. Pain Foundation has created a pretty good survey that you can fill out to describe how chronic pain affects your whole life.

U.S. Pain Foundation has partnered with Health Union — which offers health-focused online communities and news content — to conduct a survey, “Chronic Pain In America 2019.”

The goal? To get a better understanding of 

  • how people with chronic health conditions experience pain
  • how they navigate the health care system, and 
  • what their experiences are managing and treating chronic pain.  

Continue reading

Little evidence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia

Evidence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in clinical populations after chronic opioid exposure: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Br J Anaesth. – 2019 Jun

Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is well documented in preclinical studies…

It’s such a trendy topic that I’m sure many researchers are looking for evidence that chronic pain patients only need high doses because they are suffering from “opioid-induced hyperalgesia”, which has still NOT been proven in humans.

…but findings of clinical studies are less consistent.

This isn’t surprising to most pain patients, who know the difference between their increasing pain and hyperalgesia.  Continue reading

Chronic opioid use and five-year survival

Trends in chronic opioid use and association with five-year survival in South Korea: a population-based cohort study. – Sep 2019

This research study came to some very interesting and highly unusual conclusions.

The Korean National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) was developed to provide population data for medical research.

The aim of this study was to estimate trends in prescription opioid use in South Korea, and to determine the association between chronic opioid use and 5-yr mortality in cancer and non-cancer patients.   Continue reading

Women More Adept Than Men At Discerning Pain

Women May Be More Adept Than Men At Discerning Pain : Shots – Health News : NPR – August 26, 2019 – Patti Neighmond  – Twitter

I like this article because it has links to reputable sources, like PubMed abstracts from the NIH. Unfortunately, it starts out with the usual trope:

The pathway to opioid abuse for women often starts with a prescription from the doctor’s office. [wrong, wrong, wrong…]

This is an outdated and completely incorrect myth of anti-opioid propaganda. The CDC data clearly shows that pain patients taking prescribed (for them) opioids account for only a minuscule number of the opioid overdoses, as I have posted previously:  Continue reading