Tag Archives: rules

Guidelines should allow for individual decisions

National Academies outlines new guidelines for opioid prescribing – By Andrew Joseph @DrewQJosephDec 2019

 A new report issued Thursday by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine outlines a framework for prescribers and others to develop their own plans for acute pain, without offering any direct recommendations itself. 

Here is finally a sensible “guideline” that essentially says to ignore specific “rules” and work with individual patients to find what works best for them.

But I expect the simplistic anti-opioid rules fabricated by non-medical “experts” will continue to override any thoughtful guidance from respected scientific groups like the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

After all, what could scientists possibly know that PROPagandists don’t?   Continue reading

Outcomes of Opioid Misuse Prevention Policies

The Association of State Opioid Misuse Prevention Policies With Patient- and Provider-Related Outcomes: A Scoping Review – Dec 2019

Policy Points:

  • This scoping review reveals a growing literature on the effects of certain state opioid misuse prevention policies, but persistent gaps in evidence on other prevalent state policies remain.
  • [I had to skip the 2nd “policy point” because it was so absurd, again urging restrictions on prescribed opioids, which are NOT the problem]
  • Further research should concentrate on potential unintended consequences of opioid misuse prevention policies, differential policy effects across populations, interventions that have not received sufficient evaluation (eg, Good Samaritan laws, naloxone access laws), and patient-related outcomes.

Continue reading

Opioids Prescriptions Rare before OUD or Overdose

Trends in prescription opioid use and dose trajectories before opioid use disorder or overdose in US adults from 2006 to 2016: A cross-sectional studyNov 2019

I’m not going to pretend to be impartial and scientific anymore – this obscene charade of drug-warriors fighting what they call an “opioid epidemic” has gone to such ridiculous extremes (no opioids after cutting open a woman’s abdomen to pull her baby out) that I can no longer restrain my outrage.

With governments’ increasing efforts to curb opioid prescription use and limit dose below the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-recommended threshold of 90 morphine milligram equivalents per day, little is known about prescription opioid patterns preceding opioid use disorder (OUD) or overdose.

Limiting opioid prescriptions never worked in the past, isn’t working now, and never will work. It cannot work because legitimate opioid prescriptions are not related to opioid overdoses. How long will it take these bureaucrats to figure this out?  Continue reading

How consumers can interact with state medical boards

How can consumers interact with state medical boards? – National Pain Report – by Geoff Sims – Oct 2019

Editor’s Note: When Dr. Thomas Kline tweeted last week that it’s time for chronic pain patients to “flood state medical boards with online complaints” about being cutoff w/ the CDC and “federal drug police invalid medical excuses, we asked Terri Lewis Ph.D. for an article that shows patients how they can do it and why it might be a good idea.

Many patients do not know where to turn when they have concerns about the competency or conduct of a doctor. State medical boards are government agencies, usually housed in state Departments of Health, that are empowered to investigate complaints about doctors and, when warranted, take action against them.   Continue reading

DEA Branching Out Into Regulating Medicine

Is the DEA Branching Out Into Regulating Medicine? | Cato @ LibertyBy Jeffrey A. Singer – Sep 2019

This truly seems to be happening. Until now, the “practice of medicine” was carefully defined and defended by the AMA and anybody who tried to step between doctors and their patients was hauled into court.

This time around, the AMA has been noticeable mainly by their silence in the face of this assault on the integrity of medicine, when politicians and law enforcement agencies are controlling what kind of medical care doctors are “allowed” to provide their patients.

After a few brave individual doctors had been pushing back for years, and when the CDC and FDA were close to issuing their own statements warning against the abandonment and forced tapers imposed on patients, only then did the AMA finally release its own statement advising against such barbaric (and virtually illegal, in the case of patient abandonment) practices.  Continue reading

Health Officials Urge Caution in Reducing Opioids

Health Officials Urge Caution in Reducing Opioids for Pain Patients – The New York TimesBy Abby Goodnough – Oct 2019

In a newly published guide, federal health officials say doctors “should never abandon” pain patients and warn of acute withdrawal and other risks.

The Trump administration on Thursday instructed doctors to use more caution when taking chronic pain patients off opioid medications, a response to reports that many have been cutting off prescriptions too quickly, in some cases even dismissing patients from their practice.

Question: Why did we have to wait 3 1/2 years for this?
Answer: because no one wanted to know the results.  Continue reading

PDMPs proven to be Ineffective

Study Finds Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Ineffective at Curbing Overdoses – by Allison Inserro – May 2019

This is the kind of interesting information I find when I look at journals for the medical-business industry; this article is from the American Journal of Managed Care.

Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are now in place in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in response to rising levels of overdoses involving opioids and synthetic opioids.

But a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that sought to clarify the relationship between PDMPs and their effectiveness in attacking the nation’s drug problem found limited to no evidence that they actually work.

It couldn’t be any clearer. They keep applying solutions for prescribing problems, wasting time while more and more people die of overdoses. Continue reading

Corporate Law Creates Sociopaths

The Most Important Problem in the World – Medium by James Gamble – Mar 2019

The most important problem in the world is a reasonable sounding provision of the corporate law that governs most major U.S. companies.

The rule: corporate management and Boards of directors are obligated by law to make decisions that maximize the economic value of the company.

This is how you end up with absurdities like this: 400% price hike for drugs is ‘moral requirement’. It’s frightening to be at the mercy of such ruthless entities making our health unaffordable, yet this is what corporations were created to do.  Continue reading

Rein In ‘Sociopaths’ in the Boardroom

Ex-Corporate Lawyer’s Idea: Rein In ‘Sociopaths’ in the Boardroom – NY Times – By Andrew Ross Sorkin – July 2019

This “reformed” lawyer points out a fundamental flaw of our capitalist system that is responsible for increasing income inequality (rich getting richer, poor getting poorer), dysfunctional government (gridlock), and social decay (deaths of despair).

These troubles stem from a particular aspect of corporate law, and he proposes a relatively simple solution to change how corporations operate.

Jamie Gamble, a retired corporate lawyer, has had an epiphany in recent years: The executives who hired him and that his firm sought to protect, he said, “are legally obligated to act like sociopaths.”   Continue reading

Opioids allocated based on business decision

‘Business decision’: Former DEA official works for opioid lawyers but set standards for how many pills were madeBy John O’Brien | Sep 3, 2019

The DEA knew more about what quantities of opioids went where than anyone else, so I’m baffled why they didn’t stop the excessive orders that everyone is complaining about now.

Asked what would’ve happened if a pharmaceutical distributor wanted advice on whether a large order of opioids was suspicious, the man in charge of federal regulation of those pills for 10 years said he wouldn’t have helped.

Instead, Joe Rannazzisi, who set always-increasing opioid quotas for theindustry while he headed a Drug Enforcement Agency department from 2005-15, said the company would be left on its own to figure it out.    Continue reading