Tag Archives: rules

A virus walks into a bar…

Packed Bars Serve Up New Rounds Of COVID Contagion | Kaiser Health News – By Jordan Rau and Elizabeth Lawrence June 25, 2020

As states ease their lockdowns, bars are emerging as fertile breeding grounds for the coronavirus.

Public health authorities have identified bars as the locus of outbreaks in Louisiana, Florida, Wyoming and Idaho.

Bars are tailor-made for the spread of the virus, with loud music and a cacophony of conversations that require raised voices. The alcohol can impede judgment about diligently following rules meant to prevent contagion.  Continue reading

AMA recommends specific changes to CDC guideline

The full AMA letter and each recommendation to revise the CDC guideline – (continued from yesterday’s post)

…the CDC Guideline could be substantially improved in three overarching ways.

  1. First, by incorporating some fundamental revisions that acknowledge that many patients experience pain that is not well controlled, substantially impairs their quality of life and/or functional status, stigmatizes them, and could be managed with more compassionate patient care.
  2. Second, by using the revised CDC Guideline as part of a coordinated federal strategy to help ensure patients with pain receive comprehensive care delivered in a patient-centric approach. And
  3. Third, by urging state legislatures, payers, pharmacy chains, pharmacy benefit management companies, and all other stakeholders to immediately suspend use of the CDC Guideline as an arbitrary policy to limit, discontinue or taper a patient’s opioid therapy.

Continue reading

AMA urges CDC to revise opioid prescribing guideline

AMA urges CDC to revise opioid prescribing guideline | American Medical AssociationJun 18, 2020

Finally! I’m still outraged that the AMA stood by silently for 5 long years as more and more pain patients were deprived of legitimate medical opioid treatment.

They remained silent as law enforcement second-guessed doctors’ decisions and essentially dictated our treatment. I didn’t hear a peep of protest when appropriate medical care was decided by the DEA and enforced by SWAT teams.

So pardon me if I’m not giving the AMA adulation or kudos or praise for doing what they should have done 5 years ago. Their inaction led directly to the suicides of so many pain patients who were deprived of pain relief on the basis of these appallingly arbitrary and misapplied CDC guidelines.  Continue reading

Guidelines Written and Manipulated by Insiders

Professional Societies Should Abstain From Authorship of Guidelines and Disease Definition StatementsJohn P.A. Ioannidis – Oct 2018

Guidelines and other statements from professional societies have become increasingly influential. These documents shape how disease should be prevented and treated and what should come within the remit of medical care.

Changes in definition of illness can easily increase overnight by millions the number of people who deserve specialist care. This has been seen repeatedly in conditions as diverse as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, composite cardiovascular risk, depression, rheumatoid arthritis, or gastroesophageal reflux.

Similarly, changes in prevention or treatment options may escalate overnight the required cost of care by billions of dollars.

For example, if we accept PROP’s argument that we’re all addicted to our “heroin pills”, we’d all suddenly need “addiction-recovery programs/clinics/residential treatment centers/resorts” for our  “substance abuse” instead of “chronic pain”.  Continue reading

Flaws Found in Interventional Treatment Guidelines

Flaws Found in Interventional Treatment GuidelinesPain Medicine Newsby Harry Fortuna – Mar 2020

Assessors were unable to give full votes of confidence to any of the four recently evaluated interventional guidelines created by major North American pain medicine societies.

Of further concern,

  • only half of the sample studied was found to be of high methodological quality, and
  • none of the guidelines surveyed adeptly involved all stakeholders such as patients, providers and payors.

Continue reading

Inaccurate Opioid Information Used by Lawmakers

Damaging State Legislation Regarding Opioids: The Need To Scrutinize Sources Of Inaccurate Information Provided To Lawmakers – free full-text /PMC6857667/Michael E Schatman and Hannah Shapiro2019 Nov

On January 22, 2019, a Massachusetts State Representative introduced House Bill 3656, “An Act requiring practitioners to be held responsible for patient opioid addiction”.

Section 50 of this proposed legislation reads, “A practitioner, who issues a prescription … which contains an opiate, shall be liable to the patientfor the payment of the first 90 days of in-patient hospitalization costs if the patient becomes addicted and is subsequently hospitalized”.

When asked of the source of medical information on which he based his bill, the Representative mentioned the name of a nationally known addiction psychiatrist.

Though unmentioned, this is clearly referring to our nemesis, Mr. Kolodny, who has continued using cherry-picked data from years ago to make his claims that “opioids cause addiction”.  Continue reading

Guidelines should allow for individual decisions

National Academies outlines new guidelines for opioid prescribing – By Andrew Joseph @DrewQJosephDec 2019

 A new report issued Thursday by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine outlines a framework for prescribers and others to develop their own plans for acute pain, without offering any direct recommendations itself. 

Here is finally a sensible “guideline” that essentially says to ignore specific “rules” and work with individual patients to find what works best for them.

But I expect the simplistic anti-opioid rules fabricated by non-medical “experts” will continue to override any thoughtful guidance from respected scientific groups like the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

After all, what could scientists possibly know that PROPagandists don’t?   Continue reading

Outcomes of Opioid Misuse Prevention Policies

The Association of State Opioid Misuse Prevention Policies With Patient- and Provider-Related Outcomes: A Scoping Review – Dec 2019

Policy Points:

  • This scoping review reveals a growing literature on the effects of certain state opioid misuse prevention policies, but persistent gaps in evidence on other prevalent state policies remain.
  • [I had to skip the 2nd “policy point” because it was so absurd, again urging restrictions on prescribed opioids, which are NOT the problem]
  • Further research should concentrate on potential unintended consequences of opioid misuse prevention policies, differential policy effects across populations, interventions that have not received sufficient evaluation (eg, Good Samaritan laws, naloxone access laws), and patient-related outcomes.

Continue reading

Opioids Prescriptions Rare before OUD or Overdose

Trends in prescription opioid use and dose trajectories before opioid use disorder or overdose in US adults from 2006 to 2016: A cross-sectional studyNov 2019

I’m not going to pretend to be impartial and scientific anymore – this obscene charade of drug-warriors fighting what they call an “opioid epidemic” has gone to such ridiculous extremes (no opioids after cutting open a woman’s abdomen to pull her baby out) that I can no longer restrain my outrage.

With governments’ increasing efforts to curb opioid prescription use and limit dose below the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-recommended threshold of 90 morphine milligram equivalents per day, little is known about prescription opioid patterns preceding opioid use disorder (OUD) or overdose.

Limiting opioid prescriptions never worked in the past, isn’t working now, and never will work. It cannot work because legitimate opioid prescriptions are not related to opioid overdoses. How long will it take these bureaucrats to figure this out?  Continue reading

How consumers can interact with state medical boards

How can consumers interact with state medical boards? – National Pain Report – by Geoff Sims – Oct 2019

Editor’s Note: When Dr. Thomas Kline tweeted last week that it’s time for chronic pain patients to “flood state medical boards with online complaints” about being cutoff w/ the CDC and “federal drug police invalid medical excuses, we asked Terri Lewis Ph.D. for an article that shows patients how they can do it and why it might be a good idea.

Many patients do not know where to turn when they have concerns about the competency or conduct of a doctor. State medical boards are government agencies, usually housed in state Departments of Health, that are empowered to investigate complaints about doctors and, when warranted, take action against them.   Continue reading