Tag Archives: rules

Medical Assn. President Shares Pain Horror Story

Calif. Medical Assn. President Shares Medical Horror Story – by Cheryl Clark, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today – Jan 2019

The new president of the California Medical Association was expecting to spend New Year’s at a wedding in Las Vegas.

Instead, David Aizuss, MD, posted on Facebook about his “eye opening” first-hand view of “American medicine at its worst.”

While I’m sorry for what he endured, I can’t help but be pleased that such a high-ranking doctor suffered exactly the same brutal treatment pain patients struggle with: the routine refusal to relieve pain (if not outright disbelief and accusations of drug-seeking).   Continue reading

Use of Big Data to Investigate Doctors

Authorities’ Use of Big Data May Harm—or Help—Your Chances of Investigation – By Efrem M. Grail – September 12, 2018

A former prosecutor and current defense lawyer shares strategies to help protect your practice.

This is what it has come to: lawyers are advising doctors how to practice medicine without ending up in jail.

As pain practitioners well know, two recent developments – one federal, one state – have combined to increase the risk of providers being investigated for prescribing opioids for their patients.   Continue reading

Review of HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices

This major report is long and detailed, so I covered most of it in three long posts:

  1. HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 1
  2. HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 2
  3. HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 3

 

If you’re interested in a particular section of the report, below is the full article outline with links to each section:   Continue reading

HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 3

Draft Report on Pain Management Best Practices | HHS.gov – Dec 2018

This document is so long and so detailed that I spent hours working it over to add my own voluminous commentary.

I posted the second, most significant part yesterday, HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 2, and the first part the day before: HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 1.  

This is the third and final part of my series, and covers the middle of the document, starting where I left off in the second part detailing interventional procedures. Continue reading

HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 2

Draft Report on Pain Management Best Practices | HHS.gov – Dec 2018

This document is so long and so detailed that I spent hours working it over to add my own voluminous commentary. I posted the first part yesterday: HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 1.

Below is the second part, covering more about opioid medication with all its “risk” and then the final, most significant section, covering the problems and errors of the CDC Opioid Prescribing Guidelines:

2.2.1 Risk Assessment  Continue reading

HHS Report on Pain Mgmt Best Practices – part 1

This seems like the first good news in a while: a government agency admitting that most opioid overdoses are from illicit fentanyl. The report also documents the downsides of non-opioid medications and highlights the predicament of pain patients.

Draft Report on Pain Management Best Practices | HHS.gov

This document is so long and detailed that I spent hours picking it over to find the critical pieces and add my own commentary. It’s far from perfect, but still a welcome change from the usual PROPaganda – and I choose to celebrate.

Here’s the first part:   Continue reading

Corporate Practice of Medicine: Who Controls What?

Corporate Practice of Medicine: Medical Management Organizations and Professional Medical Corporations-Who Controls What? – Cohen Healthcare Law Group | Healthcare Lawyers | Life Sciences | FDA & FTC Law – May 2018

As more doctors are now contractors for giant medical corporations (like Kaiser) I’m seeing more restrictions (like how many patients/day and minutes/patient) placed on them by those corporations.

To me, this is clearly the “corporate practice of medicine” and it seems to fit the definitions of what’s not allowed, so I don’t understand why it’s allowed.

The Corporate Practice of Medicine (CPM) doctrine continues to befuddle, beleaguer, and bewilder healthcare companies seeking to venture with physicians and non-physician entrepreneurs.  Continue reading

Corporate Practice of Medicine Forbidden

Corporate Practice of Medicine – an example of its prohibition from the Medical Board of California – 2015

The following is to provide guidance to physicians on the prohibition against the corporate practice of medicine. A presentation on the corporate practice of medicine, including frequently asked questions and common concerns, was provided at the Medical Board of California’s Quarterly Board meeting on January 29, 2015.

The Medical Practice Act, Business and Professions Code section 2052, provides:

“Any person who practices or attempts to practice, or who holds himself or herself out as practicing…[medicine] without having at the time of so doing a valid, unrevoked, or unsuspended certificate…is guilty of a public offense.” Continue reading

Mandated Queries of the Florida PDMP

Mandated Queries of the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program: Early Experiences from a Cancer Center-based Outpatient Palliative Medicine Clinic – September 14, 2018 – by Chad Kollas (@ChadDKollas) via pallimed.org

Background and Introduction

On July 1, 2018, Florida implemented a new law requiring all licensed physicians to query the state’s prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP), known as the Electronic Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substances Evaluation (E-FORSCE), before prescribing controlled medications, including opioid analgesics

In light of this anxiety about the potential impact of the new law on both patients and physicians, we initiated a quality improvement (QI) project to characterize its effects and identify opportunities to improve palliative care in the setting of implementation of the new law.  Continue reading

Stanford Letter to Oregon Chronic Pain Task Force

Stanford Letter to Oregon Chronic Pain Task Force – protesting forced opioid tapers and showing these proposals go against guidelines and evidence

We, the undersigned, write to respond to the above-mentioned document released by the Chronic Pain Task Force regarding opioid medication coverage for Oregon Medicaid patients.

In our view, the Task Force embraces a state-mandated treatment change that contravenes the three major national and international guidelines on prescribing opioids for chronic pain.

These guidelines include:

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for Opioid Prescribing,
  • the 2017 Canadian Guideline for Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain, and
  • the VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Pain V. 3.0 – 2017  Continue reading