Incorrect Medical Information has Dire Consequences

The Press: Incorrect Medical Information, Dire Consequences! | American Council on Science and HealthBy Wolfgang Vogel — Oct 2019

Reporters and editors have the duty to inform the public about current events. In fulfilling this duty, every journalist must follow the journalistic code of ethics; reports must be based on proven facts or when personal opinions are used they must be clearly be labeled as such.

Sometimes we don’t even realize the difference between something we have knowledge of and something we only believe. More than once in my life, things I thought I “knew” turned out to be more assumptions or opinions rather than facts. Continue reading

IV APAP of Little Benefit for Cardiothoracic Post-op Pain

IV APAP of Little Benefit for Cardiothoracic Post-op Pain – Pain Medicine Newsby Kenneth Bender – Aug 2019

This is an amazingly honest negative evaluation of IV Tylenol, which some people claimed was just as effective as opioids. But this study is a reality check and brings more science and less hype to the overcrowded field of opioid/pain studies.

Intravenous acetaminophen provided little benefit in multimodal analgesia regimens for cardiothoracic postoperative pain and posed a risk for hypotension, according to a study of outcomes in a real-world population.

I’m thrilled to hear it stated so definitively after so many years of hearing how great of a pain killer Tylenol is.  Continue reading

Fascia Research from the NIH

Because fascia is made from collagen, the genetic defect from EDS will often cause us problems with this tissue. It’s thin, fragile, stretches too much, and gives way too easily.

PubMed Central® (PMC) is a free full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM).

Research on the body’s fascia (connective tissue) is finding more and more of its functions and abilities, going far beyond just “holding stuff together”.  I’ve posted here the abstracts of the following 4 articles and you can decide for yourself if they’re worth reading in full.

  1. Smooth Muscle
  2. Visceral Fascia
  3. Bone Tissue
  4. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

Continue reading

The Tyranny of the Randomized Controlled Trial

Should we beware the tyranny of the randomized controlled trial? | Association of Health Care Journalistsby Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) – Jan 2017

The intersection of scientific research, evidence and expertise can be a dicey one, particularly in an age in which evidence-based medicine is replacing the clinical expertise of practitioners.

In The New York Times Sunday Review, Jamie Holmes wrote about how the challenge of assessing the quality of evidence against expertise and less stringently conducted research can lead readers to confusion and frustration.

It can lead to a further distrust of science, Holmes suggested, noting the example of dental flossing in the wake of an Associated Press story that questioned the evidence in favor of the practice.    Continue reading

Civil Rights Case Gives Hope to Pain Patients

Civil Rights Case Gives Hope to Pain PatientsBy Richard Dobson, MD, Guest Columnist – Pain News Network – Feb 2019

Here’s a hopeful development: an example of a successful suit on the basis of discrimination under the Americans with Disability Act (ADA).

People with chronic disabling pain frequently complain that doctors discharge them from their practice because of the medications they take. Sometimes doctors refuse to accept patients who are taking opioid pain medications, even though the medications treat a legitimate medical condition.

There may be hope that such actions will be considered violations of the civil rights of patients. Continue reading

Only 1.3% of Overdose Victims Had Opioid Rx

Study Finds Only 1.3% of Overdose Victims Had Opioid Prescription — Pain News Network – By Pat Anson – Oct 2019

It’s long been a popular belief that prescription opioids fueled the nation’s opioid crisis and play a major role in overdose deaths. The CDC’s 2016 opioid guideline says as much.

But a new study by researchers in Massachusetts has turned that theory on its head. Prescription opioids are not usually involved overdoses.

And even when they are, the overdose victim rarely has an active prescription for them – meaning the medications were diverted, stolen or bought on the street.   Continue reading

Critical link between pain intensity and suicide

VA study uncovers critical link between pain intensity and suicide attempts   Oct 2019

Here’s the earthshattering conclusion of a new study:

New study finds pain intensity is a telling risk factor for suicide!

Apparently, this is BIG news for the medical community. They’ve never found such results before – probably because no one has studied it.

It saddens me that most people still don’t understand how devastating chronic pain becomes, how it upends lives and sometimes cuts them short.  Continue reading

Most People Don’t Feel Euphoric From Opioids

Most People Don’t Actually Feel Euphoric When They Take Opioids, Study Finds | Live Science –  By Nicoletta Lanese – Oct 2019

Opioids are known to spark feelings of euphoria in users, but does everyone really share the same experience?

Opioids jump-start the brain’s reward system, provoking a burst of pleasurable feelings along with a dizzying drug-induced high. At least that’s what scientists used to think

But mounting research suggests that the average person doesn’t actually reach this euphoric state on opioids, particularly not the first time they try it. In fact, people who are not addicted to opioids may feel subjectively worse after taking the drug, according to cognitive neuroscientist Siri Leknes.    Continue reading

Long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain

Long-term opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain. NIH – Feb 2015 – a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, tolerability, and safety in open-label extension trials with a study duration of at least 26 weeks (that’s 1/2 year).

This study confirms what pain patients all know: long-term opioids are effective for long-term pain, require few increases, and only rarely result in “opioid use disorder”. 

The efficacy and safety of long-term (≥ 6 months) opioid therapy (LtOT) in chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) is under debate.A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and harms of opioids in open-label extension studies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has not been conducted until now.   Continue reading